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EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW


Here, he talks about his passion, New York energy and his years spent at Northampton College.


From Northampton


College to NEW YORK’S best


restaurant... By Damian Gawel


Born in Milton Keynes and living in Northampton since he was 12, Laurie Jon Moran completed a catering course at Northampton College in 2002. After a series of high profile jobs, the New York Times


called the 31 year old Englishman one of the best chefs in the Big Apple. He recently became the Executive Pastry chef at New York’s Le Bernardin ± t he restaurant considered one of the best in the world!


94 www.r-magazine.co.uk Photo by William Hereford


WHAT DO YOU REMEMBER FROM YOUR TIME AT NORTHAMPTON COLLEGE? ANY PARTICULAR ANECDOTES, STORIES, DISASTERS IN THE KITCHEN YOU KEPT IN MIND?


Oh, I am sure there were plenty of disasters (laughs)! I’ve got a lot of fond memories. I remember coming to an Open Day, the teachers being very highly skilled and very passionate about teaching. I felt I got a very good education here. I knew that I wanted to be a chef and not all my peers on the course had the same determination. I worked throughout college. One of those jobs was a part-time chef position at Te Lime Trees Hotel on Barrack Road.


BUT IMMEDIATELY AFTER FINISHING AT THE COLLEGE YOUR CAREER ROCKETED!


When I finished college I worked in London for six months, at St. Martin’s Lane Hotel in Covent Garden. I got that job after my successful work experience there during the course. After that I spent four years at Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons in Oxford [owned and run by the leading French chef Raymond Blanc], learnt a lot and headed for New York.


Why New York? While I worked at Le Manoir we hosted a two week American Food Revolution event


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