This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The act would allow Medicare patients and their physicians to enter into private contracts without penalty to either party. It would enable beneficiaries to use their Medicare benefits to see physicians who do not accept Medicare, as opposed to paying for the entire cost of their care out of pocket as required under current law. This legislation would ensure that seniors can see any physician they choose, even if that physician cannot accept their Medicare.


TMA Recommendations


• Reverse recent cuts in physicians’ Medicare, Medicaid, and Children’s Health Insurance Program payments, particularly those that hurt access to care.


• Devise and enact a system for providing health care to low-income Texans with realistic payment to physicians, less stifling state bureaucracy, and no fraud-and-abuse witch hunts.


ENDNOTES


86 Martin, Anne et al. Growth In US Health Spending Remained Slow In 2010; Health Share Of Gross Domestic Product Unchanged From 2009. Health Affairs. 2012. 31(1):1-13.


87 The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Statehealthfacts.org. Texas: Uninsured Population. 2009-2010. Available at http://www. statehealthfacts.org/profileglance.jsp?rgn=45&rgn=1. Accessed April 2012.


88 Medical Group Management Association. Cost Survey 2011


89 Texas Health and Human Services Commission. HHSC Point in Time Count -- Medicaid Enrollment by Month, 2012. Available at http:// www.hhsc.state.tx.us/research/MedicaidEnrollment/PIT-Monthly.asp. Accessed April 2012.


90 Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Underinsured. Medicaid Coverage and Spending in Health Reform: National and StatebyState Results for Adults at or Below 133% FPL. May 2010. Available at http:// www.kff.org/healthreform/upload/Medicaid-Coverage-and-Spending- in-Health-Reform-National-and-State-By-State-Results-for-Adults-at-or- Below-133-FPL.pdf.


91 The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Statehealthfacts.org. Texas: Medicaid Spending. 2009. Available at http://www.statehealthfacts.org/ profileind.jsp?sub=47&rgn=45&cat=4. Accessed April 2012.


92 Texas Health and Human Services Commission. Texas Medicaid and CHIP in Perspective. Eighth Edition, January 2011. (The “Pink Book”)


93 Texas Medical Association. Medicaid/CHIP Funding. Available at http://www.texmed.org/template.aspx?id=19658. Accessed April 2012.


94 The Center for Strategic Decision Support, Texas Health and Human Services Commission. April 2012.


95 For illustration only. Medicare payments vary by region of the state.


96 American Medical Association. Now Is The Time To Repeal The SGR. 2012.


97 Texas Medical Association. Survey Results for Texas Medical Association Medicare SGR Survey. August 2011. Available at http:// www.texmed.org/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=225 31&libID=20171. Accessed April 2012.


98 Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Focus on Health Reform: Summary of Key Changes to Medicare in 2010 Health Reform Law. Publication #7948-02.


• Support development of innovative payment and delivery system reforms, such as the patient- centered medical home and physician-led accountable care organizations, to help slow Medicaid spending. (See Section 2.)


• Maintain physician loan repayment programs to help entice more physicians to participate in Medicaid.


• Repeal the dual-eligible payment cut.


• Repeal the broken Sustainable Growth Rate payment formula. Enact a rational Medicare physician payment system that works and is backed by a fair, stable funding formula.


• Fix the broken Medicare physician payment system before giving additional increases to any other providers.


• Repeal the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB). Keep Congress accountable for the Medicare system. If decisions are made to limit funding for health care services, priorities will have to be set. It should not be left, however, to an unelected and unaccountable IPAB.


• Pass the Medicare Patient Empowerment Act. Give physicians the ability to contract directly for any and all Medicare services.


January 2013 TEXAS MEDICINE 63


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68