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believe the vast majority of osteopathic programs AOA now accredits can meet the new standards. Dr. Buser added that one of the non- negotiables in the process is that com- munity-based programs would not be disadvantaged wholesale. But the orga- nizations will not compromise on quality. “This is not a question of protecting slots for the sake of protecting slots. It’s about working with any program, whether ACGME or AOA, to help them meet the standards and minimize the risk” of losing any of them, he said. To that end, ACGME will work with


AOA and AACOM to design communica- tion and educational programs to high- light standards and expectations and give residency programs time to adjust.


AG: THECB has authority on foreign medical schools


Foreign medical schools could begin sending their students to Texas for clini- cal training. According to recent opinion by Texas


Attorney General Greg Abbott, state law gives the Texas Higher Education Coor- dinating Board (THECB) the discretion to decide whether foreign-based institu- tions may grant medical degrees in the Lone Star State. The board sought the opinion after the American University of the Carib- bean, a for-profit medical school owned by DeVry, Inc., asked THECB for a certifi- cate of authority to contract with Texas hospitals and other health care facilities to provide clinical training for third- and fourth-year students from the school, lo- cated on the island of St. Maarten. The proposal sparked concerns among the state’s medical schools, some state lawmakers, and the Texas Medical Association that it would displace Texas medical students from existing clinical clerkships. DeVry officials have argued the move could bring more physicians to Texas.


January 2013 TEXAS MEDICINE 47


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