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diet, exercise, infectious disease status, age-eligibility of treatments, and safe- discharge criteria.


The right to health care cannot eas- ily be divided from its funding, and the funding cannot easily be divided from fiscal oversight, even when such over- sight is intrusive. TMA and other organs of organized medicine must be prepared to discuss these questions as they arise, no matter how difficult — and possibly even dis- tasteful — such may be. These questions will be asked and de- cided, and for this to occur without phy- sicians’ input will put our patients’ rights and safety at risk.


Stephen L. Brotherton, MD Fort Worth


TMA President–Elect


Hard hats for horseback riders


I am always delighted to see articles about the importance of helmets and safety, especially with regard to TMA’s Hard Hats for Little Heads program. (See “Preventing Injury,” October 2012 Texas Medicine, pages 35–39.) What has always puzzled me, however, is the lack of mention of riding helmets for horse- back riding. According to the 2007 National Elec-


tronic Injury Surveillance System data, there were more than 78,000 horseback riding-related injuries reported in U.S. emergency rooms, with head injuries comprising 15 percent of these. Given that Texas has approximately 1 million horses, the most of any state, it seems some mention should be made about horseback riding and the role helmets certified by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) can play


in the protection against head injuries, especially for children. As an avid rider myself, it always concerns me to see anyone atop a horse without proper head protection, given that their heads are potentially 13 feet or so above ground. Riding an animal with emotions and prey instincts puts anyone at risk of an adverse event, but especially our children who may not be able to anticipate a problem. The website www.Riders4Helmets .com is an excellent resource for informa- tion and education about the importance of wearing an ASTM-certified helmet while riding. Let’s embrace our equine heritage and our role as the leading horse state in the country by including horseback riding in the push for greater helmet awareness and use!


Caren C. Reaves, MD Denton


How Do You Treat Adolescent and Young Cancer Survivors?


• One in every 640 young adults between the ages of 20 and 39 in the U.S. is a survivor of childhood cancer


• Nearly 70,000 young adults (ages 15-39) are diagnosed with cancer each year in the U.S.


Do you have questions about Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) cancer survivors?


Want to learn more about late effects, screening, surveillance and survivorship plans for this unique patient population?


Find evidence-based tools, CME and CNE resources on AYA survivorship, patient and provider videos, and patient resources in one comprehensive website.


Use one-page evidence assessments (PEARLS) for practice improvement. FOR MORE INFORMATION


web: http://tinyurl.com/seton-survivorship email: aya-survivorship@seton.org


8 TEXAS MEDICINE January 2013


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