This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
THE COST OF FALL HAZARDS


In addition to protecting workers from injury, following fall protection guidelines can save your facility money. According to the Walking/Working Surfaces Standard (29 CFR 1910.23(c)(1)), “Every open-sided platform 4 ft. or more above adjacent floor or ground level shall be guarded by a standard railing on all open sides except where there is entrance to a ramp, stairway or fixed ladder.” The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s top-10 violations from FY2011 indicated this was a prominent problem in gray and ductile iron metalcasting facilities.


Table 3. Top 10 OSHA Violations for Gray & Ductile Iron Metalcasting Facilities Violation


1. Stairway floor openings and floor openings not guarded.


2. Recording criteria: Employer must keep records and record each fatality, injury and illness.


3. Electrical: General requirements.


4. Recordkeeping criteria: Injury or illness that meets recording criterial must be recorded if it results in death, days away from work, restricted work or transfer to another job, or medical treatment beyond first aid.


5. Mechanical power: Transmission apparatus. 6. Lockout/tagout.


7. Machines: General.


8. Forms: Not utilizing OSHA log. 9. Respiratory protection.


10. Confined spaces: Permit required.


OSHA Standard 1910.0023 1904.0004


1910.0303 1904.0007


1910.0219 1910.0147 1910.0212 1904.0029 1910.0134 1910.0146


over the construction industry as the equipment and work environ- ment are more stable and predict- able. Investing time and money into a potential redesign of the process or passive fall protection is a more viable option. The first and second controls have less opportunity for failure and therefore significantly reduce or even completely remove associated risks. In addition, they may provide quality, cost and pro- ductivity improvements. Be sure to evaluate fall potential when using temporary equipment. If employees cannot maintain three points of contact on a ladder (carry- ing parts or tools) or they are work- ing from the ladder, fall prevention is necessary. Pinpoint a way to provide a better work surface, hand items up to employees, or raise the parts and tools. In addition, many aerial lifts require the use of a harness and lanyard when ascending and descending, due to their jerky ascension. Te rule as it applies to scissor


lifts is clarified in OSHA’s letter of interpretation dated August 1, 2000, in which the director states scissor lifts do not fall under aerial lift require- ments and tie-off is not required in scissors lifts with properly maintained guardrails. Tis same logic applies to scaffolding with guardrails (top rail, mid rail and toe guard). Whether fall controls are used


for workplace ascension or bungee jumping, the user needs to inspect the equipment prior to each use, and a qualified person should routinely inspect it, too. It also is important to properly store equipment to keep it clean, dry and free from exposure. Employees should be trained annu- ally on how to keep all equipment in good working order to ensure proper performance and follow through with auditing and coaching to ensure it is maintained and used appropriately.


ONLINE RESOURCE An example of passive fall protection is the guardrail preventing falls from the top of this finishing system.


Visit moderncasting.com for additional articles on safety prevention.


December 2012 MODERN CASTING | 39


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60