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Table 1. Recordable Injury and Illness Cases per 100 Full-Time Workers Facility Type


stated in the Construction Standard for Fall Protection. Fall protection and pre planning work to minimize risks associated with falls should be on metalcasters’ radar. In bungee jumping, the location and anticipated path of the jump should be evaluated. Te distance to the ground and the height and weight of the individual also should be taken into consideration when calculat- ing the velocity at which the person will hurtle toward the ground. All of these factors are used to complete the calculation of the length of bungee cord required. When looking at a potential fall distance in the workplace, these same factors should be taken into consideration to select the correct lanyard length and weight require- ments (5,000 lbs). If an employee hits the ground before the system arrests him or her, protection has failed. An additional consideration to take into account in the workplace is swing and obstructions in the fall zone. While bungee jumpers can choose optimum, uncongested locations such as bridges, the workplace does not provide the same luxury. Carefully survey the work area and remove obstructions before the task begins. If this cannot


All Manufacturing


All Metalcasting Facililties Iron Metalcasters Steel Metalcasters


Steel Investment Casters Aluminum Metalcasters Aluminum Diecasters


2009 4.3


8.7


11.3 7.7 8.2 9


7.2


9.7 12


10.4 6.1 8.9


10.9


Table 2. DART: Days Away, Restricted or Transferred Employees per 100 Full-Time Workers


Facility Type All Manufacturing


All Metalcasting Facililties Iron Metalcasters Steel Metalcasters


Steel Investment Casters Aluminum Metalcasters Aluminum Diecasters


be done, shorten the fall distance to prevent contact.


Preventing the Fall Standards provided by the Ameri-


can Society of Safety Engineers describe accepted practices in fall hazard assessment and prevention. Certain standards address tasks that require employees to ascend greater than 4 ft. on a regular basis. In these cases, preplanning with written task- specific fall protection procedures can


2009 2.8


4.6 5.4 4.1 4.9 5.9 3.4


2010 2.4


5.1 5.6 6.7 4.1 4.7 5.7


2011 2.4


5.4 6.0 7.8 4.7 6.0 4.2


be recommended. Evaluate the fre- quency, likelihood and severity of the risk upfront to determine the best way to reduce that risk. Consider using tools such as “What-If Analysis” and “Failure Mode and Effects Analysis” (FEMA) that can assist in predicting potential outcomes and compare risk reduction. Section 5.1 (ANSI Z359.2) of


the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard details the preferred fall protection hierarchy used to control fall hazards: 1. Elimination or Substitution: Remove the hazard—bring the work down to ground level.


2. Passive Fall Protection: Isolate or separate hazard from workers— barriers and guardrails.


3. Fall Restraint: Prevent the person from reaching the fall hazard.


4. Fall Arrest: Properly designed sys- tem that stops a falling employee.


Scissor lifts do not fall under aerial lift requirements and tie off is not required, according to an OSHA letter of interpretation.


5. Administrative Controls: Establish work practices or procedures to warn a person to avoid approaching a fall hazard. Note that Fall Arrest is fourth in the list of choices. Be sure to evalu- ate the first three choices to see if they are feasible. For example, locate valves, pumps, motors and controls where they can be reached easily and safely. Provide catwalks or other permanent access to equipment that may require servicing. The metal- casting industry has an advantage


December 2012 MODERN CASTING | 37


2010 4.4


2011 4.4


9.6


10.9 12.7 7.3 9.5 7.8


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