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a resolution Coming to


The future of climate modelling is tied to the promise of exascale computing power. Three industry experts discuss the possibilities


Pier L. Vidale, Professor at the University of Reading, UK, and a National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) senior scientist


most powerful supercomputer in the world, the Earth Simulator. Since then, our project has continued on different machines worldwide and 18 months ago we became aware of the availability of Tier-0 (petascale) machines within PRACE (Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe). In the Upscale project we made a bid to run a global climate model with a resolution of 25km, currently that of


O 40 SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING WORLD


ur work on the Upscale Project began with an opportunity in Japan to use what was at the time the largest and


the weather forecasting models. Te idea of being able to run at that level of detail is very attractive as it means we can represent the phenomena seen in weather forecasting with the same fidelity. Tis requires the use of a big supercomputer, and there aren’t that many around the world. In the UK, there are systems located in Edinburgh (HECToR) and at the Hartree Centre (Daresbury) that come close to that level of capability, but it’s not quite there yet. PRACE enables projects like ours that require resources to which they wouldn’t otherwise


have access. Te separation of the Tiers serves to filter the different applications and ensure that the scientists who can only operate on a Tier-0 machine will be able to do so. Our bid was for 144 million core hours on the Cray XE6 system, Hermit, installed at HLRS Stuttgart in Germany, which has the same architecture as the HECToR system here


www.scientific-computing.com


Upscale Project


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