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rapidfire Companion Care H


elp is a four-legged word, according to Ca- nine Companions for Independence (CCI). The nonprofit trains and places, at no cost, service


dogs with people who have disabilities to help these indi- viduals in daily life. Recently, through its Wounded Vet- eran Initiative, CCI has been pairing wounded warriors with dogs, giving the veterans greater self-sufficiency. Airman 1st Class David Rogers, USAF-Ret., is one


such veteran with a service dog trained through CCI. Rogers (below) was injured in an on-duty car accident and emerged from a coma with extensive internal dam- age and a severe traumatic brain injury. His service dog, a black Lab mix named Jersey, helps him open doors and drawers and keeps him more upbeat and aware of his surroundings, according to his family. “He makes my day,” said Rogers, who speaks through a laptop computer secured to his wheelchair. “I enjoy playing with him.” CCI’s service dogs can help wounded veterans in


several differ- ent areas. Some are trained to assist the hear- ing impaired, and others work alongside patients in re- habilitation or physical therapy facilities. To learn more about CCI and the Wounded Veteran Initia- tive, visit www .cci.org/veterans.


ASKBUD


Q. MY RETIREE ID CARD WAS CONFISCATED RECENTLY AT A MAIN GATE. CAN YOU EXPLAIN WHY? A. If you have a retiree ID card that was manually prepared (on a typewriter), it’s time to go to the nearest Real-Time Automated Personnel Identification System


(RAPIDS) facility to get a new card. The military stopped issuing these ID cards in 1993. How can you tell whether you have a manually prepared card? • Your picture was cut from photographic paper and pasted on the card before lamination, leaving a raised photo on the card; • there are no bar codes on the reverse; or • the card stock is a version prior to “Oct 93” (print- ed at lower left on the reverse). If any of the above are true, you should get a new


ID. A manually prepared card doesn’t meet today’s heightened security standards. A base commander has discretion to bar a retiree


access to a military facility and confiscate his or her manually prepared card. Your card might be returned to you after being invalidated. The modern ID card has some distinct advantag-


es. It will mask your SSN. It also enables electronic scanning at military facilities, making the identifica- tion process quicker and more accurate. Spouses aren’t affected by this issue because, until recently, their ID cards required renewal every four years. Visit http://1.usa.gov/I1LIol to find an ID card fa-


cility in your area.


— Capt. Bud Schneeweis, USCG-Ret., CFP®, is director of MOAA’s Benefits Information and Financial Education Department.


Miscellany: Electronic Payments


GRILLING SEASON. Rear Adm. Joyce Johnson, USPHS-Ret., D.O., shares healthy summer grilling tips and marinade recipes at www.moaa.org/nutritionnotes. *SOCIAL SECURITY GOES DIGITAL. By March 2013,


all Social Security and Supplemental Security Income payments will be made electronically, says the Treasury Depart- ment. If you’re among the 10 percent of recipients who haven’t yet made the switch, the government is urging you to do so today and help save taxpayers money. To change the way you get paid, visit www.godirect.org.


PHOTOS: ABOVE, CANINE COMPANIONS FOR INDEPENDENCE; TOP RIGHT, STEVE BARRETT JUNE 2012 MILITARY OFFICER 23


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