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Deployable Infrastructure


The Future Ablution System has no external power demands. Thermal and photovoltaic panels on the roof produce hot water and electricity. And bio waste treatment systems ensure the only waste product is water


Consolidated approach


General Dynamics UK is unique in being able to bring all the necessary elements together. Its deployable infrastructure subsidiary in the UK has developed high levels of skills in the integration of systems into steel shelters to create combat-proven, deployable structures, ranging from accommodation, ablution and life-support, power and medical facilities through to communications, security and force protection, and command and control systems. Now those skills and that experience have been consolidated with General Dynamics UK’s highly advanced integration capabilities developed on programmes such as Bowman.


General Dynamics UK has also recently made


major investments in Page Europa, which designs aluminium shelter-based solutions in Rome and manufactures and fits them out in Turkey. This is now one of the most modern and sophisticated facilities of its kind in the world, and ensures that General Dynamics UK as a whole is able to deliver the broadest possible range of capabilities.


“We’re not just a shelter company,” says Jon


Anderson, Business Development Director at General Dynamics UK. “We can offer a complete operating base capability from the command post, through the communications and other key capabilities, literally through to the toilets and showers at the far corner of the compound.”


At the firm’s Ashchurch facility, General


Dynamics UK is able to deploy capabilities in C4I, mission systems, and many other disciplines, either to deliver specialised units or a complete Forward Operating Base with all components in place and fully interoperable, ready to be deployed directly from MoD Ashchurch railhead. The focusing of all these elements in a co-ordinated and concentrated manner has allowed General Dynamics UK to enhance its commitment to the development and delivery of deployable infrastructures, including a complete GBA solution.


“GBA builds on generic vehicle architecture The GBA solution would include fully equipped command and control centres


The MoD is trying to define – and we are helping them to define – those kinds of interface standards for GBA. It will means that whatever equipment is brought into a base, and whoever provides that equipment, it will be able to just plug in and operate


Jon Anderson Business Development Director


standard experience,” says Anderson. “We look at a base as a system of systems, of which the shelters are just a part. We have the ability to draw in expertise in C4I, vehicle architectures, mission and security systems – for example, Kylmar sensors – and all the other aspects that contribute towards a complete FOB, the driver being what the customer wants.”


Open architecture


This modular, building-block approach may also include tented structures and will need to accommodate a wide range of UK and NATO in-service equipment. And it must be supplier agnostic, allowing for the independent and impartial selection of sub-systems. So flexibility and adaptability are also important characteristics of any GBA solution. This is, perhaps, most keenly felt in the area of power provision.


“Power is a big driver,” says Anderson. “What


happens at the moment is that every time the MoD buys a piece of equipment, it has to spec a generator to go with it. And these are fuel-hungry and rated at the maximum required for that piece of equipment.”


What happens in practice is that the generators


actually have far more capacity than is necessary for the individual pieces of equipment most of the time, wasting fuel. What’s needed is more efficient and intelligent power management.


“If you can be smarter, use less power and


make sure that equipment coming in integrates into the power management system on the base, you can use fewer generators, less diesel and fewer logistic patrols coming forward,” explains Anderson.


Indeed, one of the shelters demonstrated at the


recent GBA event was the Future Ablution System which has no external power demands. Thermal and photovoltaic panels on the roof produce hot water and electricity. And bio waste treatment systems ensure the only waste product is water, eliminating the need to deal with the waste in other, less efficient ways (such as burning using precious diesel).


General Dynamics UK has already developed


advanced capabilities in modular and flexible power management systems through its work on vehicle architectures. The Core Infrastructure Distribution System (CIDS), for example, enables new systems to be integrated quickly and easily into vehicles thanks to the adoption of an open architecture approach incorporating a standardised power interface.


“The MoD is trying to define – and we are


helping them to define – those kinds of interface standards for GBA,” says Anderson. “It will mean that whatever equipment is brought into a base, and whoever provides that equipment, it will be able to just plug in and operate.”


Winter 2011/12 Issue 14


Dynamics 15


Trusted to deliver


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