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The best of both worlds


The Kayak Angler 2012 Fishing Kayak Buyer’s Guide releases February 1st. Until then, troll our archives at www.kayakanglermag.com/archives


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with light loads and a couple passen- gers, veteran big-water raft guide and Rapid contributing editor Jeff Jackson recommends positioning the oar locks two thirds along the waterline with the guide seat in front of the stern rise. But, he cautions, “Don’t view the frame as fixed—you’ll find different setups for various load types.”


SUP T R A C T I O N C O N TR O L


With each stroke on a SUP board, power is transferred through your feet, requir- ing constant flexing of the foot muscles for grip and balance. Over time, this can result in fatigue and loss of traction. Board wax will enhance grip but application is tedious and must be repeated frequently. Instead, purchase and install a traction pad or buy a board that comes with one already installed. Self-adhesive, aftermarket pads are available from paddling shops and on- line suppliers like X-Trak.com. A medium density material will offer the best mix of grip and comfort. Deep-grooved pads offer the most traction for technical riders but they can be brutal on bare feet and knees. Contoured pads aid posture and stance, while kick pads or tail blocks at the back of the board help with maneuvering in surf and moving water. •


Live. Love. Life [Jackets]. N e w ! 2 0 1 2


w w w . m t i a d v e n t u r e w e a r . c o m MOXIE


BOB CASCADE HEADWATER PADDLING BUYER’S GUIDE | www.rapidmedia.com 49


PHOTO: MAXI KNIEWASSER


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