This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Tumblehome


ROYAL CANOES


THE HERITAGE OF THE NOBLEST PURSUIT


Tere is such a tradition of royal weddings and canoes that when Will and Kate announced their engagement, an agile mind at CBC News started calling around to see if they might start filming the building of a two-ended wedding present. Te news scoop was a bust but it was only a matter of time before Will and Kate would do a little paddling on their honeymoon tour. In the first instance, with Fort Smith elder Francois Paulette at a


remote lodge in the Northwest Territories, the Duchess gave mean- ing to riding princess, sitting amidships on the bottom of a royal 17- foot Grumman, sans paddle, for a quick tour of Great Slave Lake. A couple of days later, however, she shucked the femme fatale persona for a gung-ho dragon boat captain’s stance, steering her crew to the starting line on Dalvey Lake on Prince Edward Island. Such is an active royal tradition that has been going on for at least 160 years. In 1860, Queen Victoria’s 19-year-old son Albert Edward (later


King Edward VII) traveled to Canada to open the bridge across the St. Lawrence River at Montreal. Sir George Simpson, then the il- lustrious Governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company, arranged to have


20 CURRENTS || Annual 2012


the Prince whisked across the mighty river in a synchronized canoe pageant involving a dozen birchbark North canoes that looped and swirled in ceremonial salute. Afterwards, one of the pageant canoes was shipped back to Eng-


land with Prince Albert, kicking off a custom of honoring royals with canoe gifts. In 1947, when Albert’s great-granddaughter Prin- cess Elizabeth was married, the happy couple received a classic Pe- terborough cedar rib canoe. Likewise, when Elizabeth’s oldest son Prince Charles married Lady Diana Spencer in 1981, one of their gifts from Canada was a beautiful Bear Mountain cedarstrip canoe. Both canoes are now on display at the Canadian Canoe Museum. But the keenest royal paddler of the bunch (if one may use such


a colloquial collective noun for the Royal Family) has to be HRH Prince Andrew, the Duke of York, who was introduced to canoe trip- ping while a student at Ontario’s Lakefield College School in 1977. Te Duke was so enamored of paddling that he was given a classic Walter Walker cedarstrip canoe by the Village of Lakefield in 1978 and has since returned to North America repeatedly to venture north


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156