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ESQUIF


ECHO (E) www.esquif.com $1,520


With its beautiful curves and elegant design, the Echo will definitely catch your attention. In addition to its unique look, you will surely notice how easy it is to maneuver when you paddle it. “The Echo is a canoe I can dance with on flatwater or take down class II rivers or on overnight trips,” mentioned National Champion Karen Knight when asked what made the Echo so special. It is the smoothest and most reliable companion for solo paddling.


Material: Royalex | Length: 14’ | Width at Gunwales: 29.625” | Depth at Center: 11.5” | Weight: 45 lbs | Capacity: 300 lbs


H NOVA CRAFT CANOE


CRONJE (F) www.novacraft.com $1,799–$3,349 CAD


The Cronje is ideally suited to paddlers who want to challenge big, open water by covering distance with ease. Fast lines and excellent tracking make it a joy to use. Cargo capacity isn’t compromised for speed and the canoe handles well both with a load and empty. Its lower profile means less wind drag on the water and lower weight on the portage trail. The Cronje is most at home in landscapes with large open lakes like the famed Boundary Waters or Algonquin Park.


Length: 17’ | Width at Gunwales: 35” | Depth at Bow: 21”; at Center: 13”; at Stern: 21” | Capacity: 1,000 lbs | Aramid, 54 lbs, $2,249 CAD | Aramid Lite, 42 lbs, $2,599 CAD | Spectra: 50 lbs, $2,799 | Blue Steel: 47 lbs, $3,349 CAD | Royalex Lite: 59 lbs, $1,799 CAD


H2O CANOE COMPANY


CANADIAN 16-6 (G) www.h2ocanoe.com $2,395–$2,995


The Canadian 16/6 is stable, well-mannered and predictable, successfully blending efficiency and a user-friendly nature, while retaining a distinct traditional Canadian canoe appearance. To reduce wind resistance and maximize efficiency, a slightly longer length and narrower beam are


carefully combined with sharp entry and exit lines, and a lower sheer. A shallow-arch hull design and shoe keel provide a rare blend of performance and stability. The keel aids tracking, protects against grounding, while sacrificing little in the way of maneuverability.


Length: 16’6” | Width at Gunwales: 35”; at Waterline: 33” | Depth at Bow: 19”; at Center: 14”; at Stern: 19” | Kevlar: 52 lbs, $2,395 | SL Kevlar: 46 lbs, $2,695 | Helium Kevlar: 42 lbs, $2,995


H2O CANOE COMPANY


PROSPECTOR 16-4 (H) www.h2ocanoe.com $2,395–$2,995


New Brunswick’s Chestnut Canoe Co. created the Prospector 16 in 1910. A century later the Prospector design is still widely considered the most versatile tripping canoe ever. The H2O Prospector 16-4’s traditional symmetrical shape combines a semi-round hull and moderate rocker for stable but sensitive pivots or leans when carving turns. Sharp entry lines flare quickly to increase buoyancy to float over large waves rather than crash through them. Responsive yet predictable under all loads and conditions, the Prospector 16-4 is a Canadian classic.


I


Length: 16’4” | Width at Gunwales: 35”; at Waterline: 32” | Depth at Bow: 21”; at Center: 14”; at Stern: 21” | Kevlar: 50 lbs, $2,395 | SL Kevlar: 44 lbs, $2,695 | Helium Kevlar: 40 lbs, $2,995


MAD RIVER CANOE


EXPLORER UL (I) www.madrivercanoe.com Aluminum Trim $2,869 / Wood Trim $3,089


The Explorer Kevlar Ultralite rounds out the classic Explorer series with a canoe that not only embodies the iconic Explorer design, but also incorporates new, lightweight technology for an impressive combination of speed, glide, responsiveness, capacity and seaworthiness. The Kevlar-foam core combination yields higher mileage per forward stroke and easy handling off the river for an amazingly rewarding, low-stress canoeing experience.


Kevlar Foam-Cored Composite Laminate | 16’3” | Width at Gunwales: 35.5”; at Waterline: 33.25” | Depth at Bow: 22.75”; at Center: 14.5”; at Stern: 21” | Aluminum Trim 45 lbs | Wood Trim 48 lbs | Capacity: 1,100 lbs


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PADDLING BUYER’S GUIDE | www.rapidmedia.com 115


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