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TAKABISHI B


breakers On July 28, Fuji-Q HighLand set the world record for the longest plastic toy train track – over 2.2km long. It took a Thomas & Friends model train almost three hours to complete the journey. Fuji-Q HighLand is home to Thomas Land, the world’s first Thomas-themed land, which opened in 1998. Other world records set at the park over the years include world’s tallest (79- metres) and fastest (130km/h) coaster for Fujiyama in 1996; world’s fastest coaster again in 2001 for Dodonpa (172km/h); and most inversions (14) for Eejanika, the park’s 4th dimension coaster from S&S Power which opened in 2006.


24 Record


Fuji-Q enters the record books (again))


Officially unveiled on July 16, Takabisha (Japanese for ‘Domineering’) features the steepest drop of any rollercoaster in the world. With a descent of 121° – as seen left – the Gerstlauer ride steals the title from Timber Drop at Fraispertuis City in France (113°), an S&S El Loco coaster that opened just a few weeks earlier. Marcus Gaines reports from Fuji-Q HighLand


uilt in the shadows of Mount Fuji, Takabishi represents a ¥3 billion ($36m/€27m) investment for Fuji-Q HighLand and the seventh rollercoaster for this amusment park in Fujiyoshida, Japan. The new ride is the first Euro-Fighter to be built by Gerstlauer Amusement Rides in Asia and is also the German manufacturer’s tallest, longest and fastest coaster ever, featuring both a launch and lifthill. “Takabisha proves perfectly that our Euro-Fighter concept has significantly evolved since its introduction in 2003,” notes Siegfried Gerstlauer. “Nearly one decade later there are 12 Euro-Fighters of all kinds and sizes. We are proud that our customer in Japan was rewarded with a new Guinness World Record.” As with several other Euro-Fighter rides, the experience begins by dropping out of a raised station


AUGUST 2011


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