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Focus on Nigeria


Dr Oronto Douglas (pictured right), President Goodluck Jonathan’s appointed strategist and before now a well-known campaigner for environmental rights in the Niger Delta, speaks on how Jonathan plans to govern the country. Interview by Ejiro Barrett and Ben Asante.


Goodluck Jonathan, an agent of change


transformation. What exactly does this mean? A: President Jonathan is not just an agent of change, and a breath of fresh air, he is also, in my opinion, a page- turner in Nigeria’s political history. Tis is the first time someone from a minority area of Nigeria has been democratically elected as president of the country. Tis is the first time someone has risen up all the rungs of the political ladder, amassing a tremendous wealth of experience on


Q 52 | June 2011 New African


President Jonathan has oſten said that he is an agent of change and


the way, before becoming president of Nigeria. Tis is also the first time a technocrat has risen to the very top, a person who believes fervently in the unity of Nigeria and who is not tainted by corruption. I’m saying this with a sense of


responsibility and without any hint of sycophancy. What I have described is the true character of Dr Jonathan, a man who has risen from a poor rural community to the apex of our leadership. When we say that he is the change we have been looking for in this country, we mean that with him


at the helm Nigeria has finally turned a new page away from the past where leadership was about the self, about where you came or come from, and not about vision. Tis time I think that page has been turned.


Q


What do you think will be the significant difference between


a Jonathan presidency and what has obtained in the past? A: Te big difference will be that Jonathan will be a president owned by the people, a president made possible by the people. Here is a man who was


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