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SCC Crypto Boundary Crypto Boundary


Crypto Module SW Programmable


I/O


Cipher Text (CT)


Plain Text (PT)


I/O SCC


Figure 2 | The ACCI UAV demonstrates the power of single-chip cryptography and partial reconfiguration.


information assurance techniques, and added a secure com- munications layer called Tactically Unbreakable Security Communications or TUCNet. TUCNet can encrypt any digital data stream. For example, it can handle video, telemetry, control, or even voice data packets.


ACCI doesn’t reveal TUCNet technical details for both security and competitive reasons. But more broadly, the company relied on features such as protocol hopping and encryption-scheme hopping to deliver a network layer that is secure over any type of wired or wireless network.


Most notably, ACCI implemented the Type 1 requirements in a single FPGA. Prior to Xilinx’s work with government agencies and the validation of Type 1 cryptographic capabilities, a design would have used multiple ICs or subsystems to isolate the red and black data and the algorithms that operate on each. The SCC technology simplified the system implementation, resulting in SWaP-C savings. At a minimum, the SCC technology eliminated one FPGA from the implementation, halving the PC-board real estate needed to host the design. Power and cost aren’t halved, because the two-chip implementation might have used slightly less dense FPGAs, but the savings are significant and even the weight is reduced by a small amount.


Compounding the SWaP-C advantages While meeting all security requirements for Type 1 cryptographic certification, ACCI’s FPGA algorithms and pro- cessing implementation compounded the SWaP-C advantages in the UAV application by using dynamic partial reconfiguration. The work Xilinx did on Type 1 cryptographic systems proved the ability to maintain proper isolation of red and black data even when reconfiguring a portion of the FPGA on the fly. With


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To meet Type 1 requirements ACCI had to isolate each of the regions of the FPGA according to defense agency specifica- tions. Using Xilinx’s SCC methodology along with the Isolation Verification Tool (IVT), ACCI was able to implement this solution and provide necessary documentation validating the isolation.


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MILITARY EMBEDDED SYSTEMS March/April 2011 29


VLAN  Airborne Repeater  AD-HOC  Masterless  QoS


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