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CHAPTER 4 RESPONDING TO GAS EMERGENCIES OBJECTIVES


At the completion of this chapter the student will be able to: • Use the DOT ERG to identify initial evacuation distances, given a natural gas emergency


• List at least three methods for identifying the presence of natural gas in an emergency


• Identify the three basic strategic modes of emergency response to a natural gas emergency


• Explain the basic operations of combustible gas indicators and list two advantages and two disadvantages of Flammable/Combustible Gas Indicators


• Identify the components of proper protective clothing for respond- ing to a natural gas emergency


• Describe four general types of releases in natural gas emergencies


• Identify at least three tactics for each of the general types of releases in natural gas emergencies


• Explain the dangers of closing transmission and/or main distribu- tion valves


• Identify the techniques for closing the flow of gas, given a customer service meter.


OVERVIEW STREET SMART TIP


DOT ERG states to approach all natural gas incidents with extreme caution for anyone in- volved with or respond- ing to a natural gas emergency—the first rule is to stay alive!


Responding to natural gas emer- gencies can be challenging. On the one hand, they can be superficially common and routine, such as “Re- spond to an odor of gas”, requiring responders only to go to the scene and investigate. On the other hand, there is always the possibility that this call is the exception, and an ex- plosive atmosphere is just waiting for an ignition source to explode. Experience teaches there is noth-


ing routine about natural gas re- leases.


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FIGURE 4.1 Although “odors of gas” calls are routine, releases can have catastrophic results.

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