This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
M
ANY RETIREES ARE DRAWN TO
THE MOUNTAINS for cool sum-
mers, snowy winters, and fresh air.
Because most military installations
are close to sea level, this might mean retirees
end up “on the economy.” Even so, altitude has a
defi nite charm. Military Offi cer has found fi ve
attractive high-elevation locales — merce Web site declares, “Mountain and dependents are referred to local
from urban to remote — each with its Home has strong ties to the base, and facilities. Specialty care is available
distinctive appeal. their issues are ‘our’ issues.” in Boise. Boise also is home to the
The area especially is popular nearest commercial airport.
Mountain Home, Idaho: with retirees who love the outdoors. Retirees generally live in neigh-
military friendly Activities range from golfi ng to bik- borhoods rather than any sort of
The small city of Mountain Home, ing, hiking, hunting, fi shing, and senior enclave. Housing costs are
Idaho, is nestled between the Dan- boating. In the winter, several ski below the national average, while the
skin and Owyhee mountains. The areas operate within a three-hour state and local tax burden generally
area has four seasons, however, since drive, and base special services usu- is in the top quarter nationally.
it is sheltered in the snow shadow of ally have discount lift passes.
the mountains to the north, it doesn’t MHAFB has a BX and a commis- Mile-high desert living
receive a lot of snow in the winter. sary. The base medical treatment Albuquerque, N.M., consistently
Mountain Home AFB (MHAFB) facility is open to eligible persons scores well in categories ranging from
is located here, and the town and the under age 65; however, enrollment top cities for empty nesters to fi ttest
state have fought hard to maintain the for TRICARE Plus for those older and greenest in terms of clean air.
base. In fact, the Chamber of Com- than 65 currently is full, so retirees Founded in 1706, this vibrant
community is at an elevation of more
Anderson Ranch Reservoir than 5,300 feet with its geography
is less than 30 miles from dominated by the Sandia Mountains.
Mountain Home, Idaho. The city’s main drag is Route 66. A
2.7-mile-long tramway transports
visitors to Sandia Peak for great
views, hiking and mountain biking
in the summer, and skiing in the
winter. Skiing also is available near
Santa Fe and Taos to the north.
Old Town, built around a tradi-
tional Spanish plaza, refl ects the city’s
history with more than 150 shops, art
galleries, restaurants, and sidewalk
vendors. Albuquerque also is home to
the University of New Mexico and the
annual Balloon Fiesta.
An annual statewide retiree appre-
ciation day offers medical screenings,
ID card services, [CONTINUES ON PAGE 58]
5 6 M I L I T A R Y O F F I C E R M A R C H 2 0 0 9 PHOTO: COURTESY IDAHO TOURISM
MMar_mountains.indd 56ar_mountains.indd 56 22/9/09 7:17:49 PM/9/09 7:17:49 PM
Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118