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servicemember died of the injury or was
killed in the line of duty while deployed, More $22
the survivor would receive coverage.
In explaining the July 1, 2006, cutoff Drugs
date for home purchases, the Appropria-
Some nasal and asthma
tions Committee staff indicated the sense
that the home market decline was under
medications are moving up.
way at that point, and the intent was to pro-
tect people who purchased homes before
they had any reason to expect a decline.
A qualifying person who sold a home O
n Jan. 8, a DoD advisory panel
recommended moving some nasal
allergy and asthma medications to
at a loss upon relocation (based on fair the third tier, or $22 copayment level.
market values determined by the secre- Drugs proposed for the higher copay-
tary of Defense) would be reimbursed ment include Beconase AQ, Rhinocort
for the lost fair market value, with the Aqua, Omnaris, Veramyst, Patanase, and
servicemember/employee absorbing a Nasacort AQ. Five medications would re-
“deductible” amounting to 5 percent of main available at lower copayment levels,
the pre-July 2006 value. including Flonase, Nasarel, Nasonex, Aste-
If the person has diffi culty selling the lin, and Atrovent.
home, DoD would have authority to pur- The asthma inhaler Maxair and the
chase the home at a price not to exceed inhalation solution Alupent also will be
90 percent of the pre-July 2006 value. moved to the higher $22 copayment. Ven-
The stimulus bill language specifi es tolin, Proventil, Proair, and Xopenex in-
this special program only could be used halers will continue to be available at the
once, and only for a primary residence. normal copayments, along with the inha-
Any previous payment under the base lation solutions Accuneb and Xopenex.
realignment and closure-related Home- The recommendations will be submitted
owner Assistance Program would make to the assistant secretary of Defense (Health
the person ineligible. Affairs) for fi nal decision.
The House version of the stimulus bill DoD will notify benefi ciaries taking
did not contain a similar provision. medications being moved to the third tier
MOAA strongly supports the Senate so they and their doctors can consider
provision and has urged House and Sen- alternative $3 or $9 medications. Infor-
ate leaders to retain this provision in the mation on alternative medications can be
fi nal stimulus bill. found via TRICARE’s Formulary Search
Other initiatives included in either the Tool at www.tricareformularysearch.org.
House or Senate plan, or both, include: A doctor who thinks it is important for
a73 a $2,500 tax credit toward the fi rst four a patient to take the third-tier medication
years of higher education expenses; can provide “medical necessity” justifi ca-
a73 more than $4 billion toward new military tion to TRICARE. If approved, the patient
hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers will continue receiving the medication at
and renovations in existing facilities; the lower copayment. MO
a73 $360 million to build more military child
development centers, $1.2 billion for new
— Contributors are Col. Steve Strobridge, USAF-
military housing projects, and $154 million
Ret., direct or; Col. Mike Hayden, USAF-Ret.; Col.
to upgrade current housing; and
Bob Norton, USA-Ret.; Cmdr. René Campos, USN-
Ret.; Cmdr. John Class, USN-Ret.; Col. Phil Odom,
a73 $950 million to improve VA medical
USAF-Ret.; Joy Dunlap; Cass Vreeland; and Bret
facilities. Shea, MOAA’s Government Relations Department.
4 0 M I L I T A R Y O F F I C E R M A R C H 2 0 0 9
MMar_scene.indd 40ar_scene.indd 40 22/9/09 7:22:45 PM/9/09 7:22:45 PM
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