This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
washingtonscene
2009. If he serves no further active duty (R-Ga.), Rep. Joe Wilson (R-S.C.), and other
service, he would receive nine months’ Hill leaders to make that legislative change.
early retirement credit and begin receiv- We also must eliminate the inequity
ing retired pay three months after his inherent in the current fi scal year calcu-
59th birthday. lation. It’s patently unfair to give three
a73 Major Smith, USAR, was activated months’ retirement age credit for a 90-day
Aug. 1, 2008, for 120 days, leaving active tour served from January through March
service Nov. 30, 2009. Because he served but not give any credit for a 120-day tour
Sen. Saxby 60 days in FY 2008 and 60 days in FY served from August through November
Chambliss
(R-Ga.)
2009, he will receive no retirement age (60 days each in separate fi scal years).
credit for FY 2008 and will have to serve And DoD must insist that service regu-
at least 30 more days in FY 2009 to get lations apply the new rules fairly and con-
any retirement age credit for that year. sistently for all.
Only certain kinds of service qualify, Today, different services — and even
including the following: different units in the same service —
a73 “contingency operation” service or often cite different authorities for the
retiree recall; same duty. To ensure all receive equal
a73 call-up of the Reserve components for credit for the same duty, active duty
war or national emergency declared by orders must consistently reference the
Rep. Joe
Congress or the president; proper statutory call-up authorities.
Wilson
a73 augmentation of the active force under
(R-S.C.) the president’s authority for operational or
emergency missions (e.g., terrorist attack); No Purple
Purple Heart
a73 call of the National Guard into federal
History
service to repel an invasion, suppress a re- Heart for PTSD
bellion, or execute the laws of the U.S.;
a73 In anticipation of the
PTSD termed secondary effect.
invasion of Japan during
a73 voluntary active duty service, including
World War II, the govern-
active duty for training under 10 U.S. code
ment had 500,000 Purple 12301(d), whether performing training or
Heart medals produced.
operational support duties; and
The lack of an invasion
created a surplus of Purple
a73 full-time National Guard duty per- A
fter months of discussion,
DoD has decided servicemembers
suffering from PTSD will not be
Heart medals. Today,
formed under 32 U.S. code 115 or 502 awarded the Purple Heart. Offi cials left
125,000 Purple Hearts
under a governor’s authority and autho- the door open for a reevaluation in the fu-
still remain from the origi- rized by the president or the secretary of ture if needed.
nal World War II batch.
Defense for a national emergency (e.g., The review was prompted by a ques-
hurricane recovery). tion to Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates
MOAA is grateful for this initial step to at a press conference in May. Gates’ initial
acknowledge the heavy sacrifi ce imposed response was that the issue was “clearly
on reserve components, but we have to something that needs to be looked at.”
do better to ensure credit is applied fairly But Gates has concurred with the fi nd-
and consistently. ings of the subsequent review.
Congress must at least provide full cred- The logic for the decision was that
it for all active duty service since Sept. 11, PTSD is a “secondary effect caused by
2001. Under current law, servicemembers witnessing or experiencing a traumatic
who served multiple combat tours between event” as opposed to a physical wounded
2001 and 2008 receive no retirement age intended by an enemy.
credit, and that’s simply wrong. MOAA One factor in the review was that PTSD
will be working with Sen. Saxby Chambliss is specifi cally listed in the federal code
3 4 M I L I T A R Y O F F I C E R M A R C H 2 0 0 9
MMar_scene.indd 34ar_scene.indd 34 22/9/09 6:57:08 PM/9/09 6:57:08 PM
Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118