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The remarkable record of Barry’s Barnardo’s girls


Make Wales better with trees, says Iolo Williams


As politicians begin to work out the detail of the future of agriculture and land use policy in Wales – Welsh Naturalist and


TV presenter Iolo


From strawberry teas to fashion shows, a remarkable group of Barry fundraisers has been supporting the children’s charity Barnardo’s Cymru for well over 50 years. While some intrepid fundraisers put their all into a one-off climb of Kilimanjaro or a skydive from 10,000 feet, the Barry Barnardo’s Helpers’ Group have been working away steadily to outlast them all while raising an estimated £175,000 along the way. The town’s very fi rst fundraising group was set


up in December 1930 and the longest


serving member of the current group, June Davis, 89, has clocked up an impressive 58 years. This year she received a special certifi cate from the charity’s Chief Executive Javed Khan recognising her remarkable record. A particular high point for June was meeting Princess Diana when she visited Barnardo’s in South Wales in her role as president. The group currently has


about 15 regular


members, quite a few of them teachers drawn to Barnardo’s work with children. Barnardo’s Cymru


provide almost 100 services across Wales ranging from support to young carers with responsibilities for sick or disabled parents or siblings to care leavers, trying to make the leap into independent adulthood. Barnardo’s Chief Executive Javed Khan had tea with the Barry group when he visited Ely Family Centre in Cardiff . He said: “I was hugely impressed with them and the


energy


they have. To support us for more than 50 years is a wonderful achievement and we are so grateful to them.”


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Williams has supported the Woodland Trust’s call for the right trees, in the right place, to have a key role in delivering a more sustainable, resilient and wildlife rich landscape in the future. The Woodland Trust (Coed Cadw) has launched a petition to this aff ect that will be presented to the Welsh Assembly on 27 February, but people can sign up online until 6 February, at www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/ welshpetition. Iolo Williams says: “Agricultural policies of the past have infl icted appalling damage the Welsh landscape and wildlife. We now have a once in a generation chance to devise a new system and put this right. It’s essential this this includes support for the planting the right trees in the right place. That’s why I’m calling for everyone who cares about our wonderful Welsh wildlife to go online and sign this petition.” The Woodland Trust is asking Welsh Government


to recast the Common


Agricultural Policy (CAP) into a Sustainable Land Use Policy - made in Wales. Up until now the CAP has failed to address the need for trees in the landscape to deliver key


environmental, public and economic gains – largely trees have been overlooked. As a result of these policies tree planting in Wales has fallen off a cliff . We are seeing the lowest tree planting levels in a generation, only 100 hectares in two of the last three years1, far short of the Welsh Government’s own ambition. The Trust is pointing out that trees and woods, in the right places, can off er huge benefi ts to landowners as well as local communities, off ering multiple benefi ts such as: • Supporting agriculture by protecting soils and sheltering livestock • Reducing fl ood risk • Producing a sustainable supply of timber • Supporting wildlife • Protecting heritage • Protecting and improving the landscape


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Cardiff & South Wales Advertiser - Friday 19th January 2018 - 11


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