search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
THINK WOMEN THE TIME FOR ACTION IS NOW


A number of reports and surveys reveal how women are most likely to shoulder the impact of the downturn resulting from the Covid-19 pandemic, Fiona Murchie responds.


T


he McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) report, COVID-19 and gender equality: Countering the


regressive eff ects, published in July 2020, puts the case in stark reality. It is underpinned by years of previous research outputs that make the case for bold action now. Using data and trends for


unemployment from surveys in the US and India, McKinsey’s report confi rms that women are more vulnerable to Covid-19- related economic eff ects because of existing gender inequalities.


COVID-19’S IMPACT ON WOMEN’S WORK The nature of work remains signifi cantly gender-specifi c, with women and men tending to cluster in diff erent occupations in both mature and emerging economies. Female jobs are 19% more at risk than male ones simply because women are disproportionately represented in sectors negatively aff ected by Covid-19. They estimate that 4.5% of women’s employment is at risk in the pandemic globally, compared with 3.8% of men’s employment. On the plus side, in sectors


such as education and healthcare, women are the majority and have suff ered relatively little impact. The strong message from the McKinsey research is that the faster


46


policy makers and business leaders act to push for greater gender equality, even as the Covid-19 crisis continues, the bigger the benefi ts – not just for gender equality, but also for economic growth. Taking action now could increase 2030 GDP by $13 trillion relative to the do-nothing scenario.


WHAT COULD MAKE A DIFFERENCE? Previous research showed the clear benefi t of investment in fi ve areas; education, family planning, maternal mortality, digital inclusion and unpaid care work. The McKinsey research further found a diversity dividend for companies. Those in the top quartile


for


gender diversity on executive teams were 25% more likely to have above-average profi tability than companies in the fourth quartile. Its conclusion is that companies


pulling back on diversity and inclusion may be placing themselves at a disadvantage in terms of resilience and the ability to recover from the current crisis; they could be limiting their access to talent, diverse skills, leadership styles and perspective. The MGI has determined the


value of unpaid care work done by women is $10 trillion or 13% of global GDP. Interventions to address unpaid childcare and the


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58