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NEWS


Abbot’s Lea School transforms KS5 provision


Woolton’s award-winning specialist school has announced it has transformed its Key Stage 5 provision for the new school year starting this September. Abbot’s Lea School, which specialises in the highest quality education for students with Autism and a range of associated learning needs, has reviewed its curricular offer for students aged 16-19, and recognised that there needs to be even more preparation for independent life and work. Headteacher Mrs Ania Hildrey, together with the new Deputy


Headteacher, Mrs Emily Tobin, and other members of the leadership team, have developed a unique curriculum that focuses entirely on the transition to adulthood. The innovative school has devised a multifaceted approach which explores


how the young adults can strive towards independence, and live a healthy and happy adult life. Over several months, students will take part in a range of modules that cover team building, mindfulness and wellbeing, personalised independent


travel, budgeting and career planning. The curriculum will concentrate heavily on the world of work. Students will


be supported to create a personalised career plan, based on their talents, strengths and what they would like to do after they leave school. No plan will be seen as too ambitious, as the school believes that an Autism diagnosis is not a barrier when it comes to future life opportunities. Quite the opposite – each person is cherished for what they bring to the school, society and the potential workplace. Specialist staff will help students work out which path is right for them,


whether that is progressing onto a Further Education college, exploring options for entry into Higher Education, or entering the workplace via a programme such as a supported internship or an apprenticeship.


uwww.abbotsleaschool.co.uk


South and City College Birminghamwins top education prize at RoSPA Health and Safety Awards


South and City College Birmingham has been named as the winner in the Education and Training Services Sector at the internationally-renowned RoSPA Health and Safety Awards. The vocational college, which offers students part-time, full-time and


apprenticeship courses in a range of subjects, was awarded the top prize for its sector this year. The sector awards are presented to organisations with outstanding


performance in health and safety within a particular industry or sector. Entrants must be able to demonstrate a robust and high-quality safety management system, together with consistently excellent or continuously improving health and safety performance. Julia Small, RoSPA’s head of awards, said: “It’s an outstanding


achievement to be named the winner in your sector at the RoSPA Awards, which are the toughest health and safety awards in the world, so South and City College Birmingham deserves all the credit it gets.” Northumbria University at Newcastle was also Highly Commended in the Education and Training Services Sector, while the University of Exeter Grounds Team was awarded the overall Best New Entry prize for the UK, sponsored by Arco.


8 www.education-today.co.uk September 2020 The RoSPA Awards, which is in its 64th year, recognises achievement in


health and safety management systems, including practices such as leadership and workforce involvement. Headline sponsor of the RoSPA Awards 2020 is NEBOSH – the National Examination Board in Occupational Safety and Health – for the 15th consecutive year. Registration for the RoSPA Awards 2021 opens on Thursday, October 1 at uwww.rospa.com/awards


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