search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FEATURE: UK EXAM LANDSCAPE


Testing times I


n the second of our Feature Focus pieces this month on the state of the UK’s exam


systems, we speak to Kevin Avison, Executive Officer at Steiner Waldorf Schools’ Fellowship. Kevin qualified as a state-trained teacher in 1973. He taught for five years in the state sector and then for five further years at a Steiner Waldorf home school. Subsequently, he then spent 11 years teaching at Ringwood Waldorf School. Kevin was the Steiner Waldorf Schools


Fellowship representative at Ringwood from 1984 until he was elected to the Fellowship Steering Group in 1989. In 1993, he was seconded to help establish the Steiner Waldorf Schools Advisory Service. During this time, he wrote a handbook for Steiner Waldorf class teachers. In 1993, Kevin became the founder teacher


at Alder Bridge School while continuing his work for the Steiner Waldorf Schools Fellowship before moving to Stourbridge in 1999. He has been a full-time member of the SWSF Executive since.


The Steiner Waldorf Schools Fellowship attitude to examinations GCSEs and A-levels are supposedly ‘rigorous’ and objective; but are they? We might justifiably ask how much talent – or more importantly how much creativity – is lost, or


at best hobbled, because of our obsession with paper-thin qualifications and focus on a narrow bandwidth of capability? Every teacher will have encountered pupils who


showed great ability but failed to perform when faced with formal examinations. Formal testing involving scripts written to answer sets of formulaic questions of more-or-lesser detail and complexity remain a bedrock activity. Particularly to mark the threshold from statutory school age to the world of adult study or employment.


32 www.education-today.co.uk June 2018 Reforms, such as the introduction of


coursework and continuous assessment, have tended to be treated with suspicion. The brief flurry created by Mike Tomlinson's 1996 report into reform of the curriculum for 16-18-year-olds fell at the first gust of "abolishing the 'gold standard' of A-levels" (Michael Howard), despite the wide support among educators for his proposal to introduce national diplomas. Gatekeepers for higher education and the main


professions are, with few exceptions, successful beneficiaries of a traditional system of assessment and the advancement associated with it. Such systems, however, are methods of exclusion: most


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48