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FEATURE ENERGY FROM WASTE KEY HIGHLIGHTS FOR 2020:


Examine optimisation concepts and technologies which aim to prolong operation hours and lifespans of EfW plants


Learn how to Design-Build-Finance- Operate a Modern Waste Management Infrastructure in an emerging market


Discuss the challenges and opportunities for CO2


capture in the Waste-to-Energy Sector


with a case study from Fortum Oslo Varme’s waste-to-energy plant at Klemetsrud


ENERGY FROM WASTE GOES VIRTUAL


SMi Group’s 13th annual Energy from Waste conference will take place on 1 – 2 December 2020 virtually


C


hanges in financing and funding opportunities, along with the increasing


need for greener and more sustainable regulations, means that the Energy from Waste industry is evolving rapidly, as it seeks to find new ways to finance and optimise Energy from Waste projects in a decarbonised world. With this in mind, the 2020 Energy from Waste


conference, taking place virtually on 1 – 2 December, will bring together international waste management operators, developers, private equity financiers, technology providers and industrial end users to address these changes, while also looking at the challenges and solutions international markets have faced regarding Energy from Waste projects and technologies.


Gain knowledge on the regulatory updates of EfW projects in Central and Eastern Europe, with an overview of the progress the region is making towards the 2020 EU target


Explore the challenges that COVID-19 poses to the waste management industry and the outlook of its economic and market impact


Delve into a range of topics, such as: the government's view on where the EFW market sits in the Biofuels Industry, the role of the RDF export and EFW in a low carbon economy, and much more


Interested parties are urged to book their tickets at www.efw-event.com


Energy from Waste 2020 www.efw-event.com


MAXIMISING THE POTENTIAL OF EXHAUST GASES H


RS Exchangers recently supplied a G Series gas cooling heat exchanger to food waste AD plant operated by one of the UK’s


leading waste management companies. The anaerobic digestion plant transforms 45,000 tonnes of food waste


from domestic and commercial sources into renewable electricity and high value digestate biofertiliser. From the beginning the plant had been designed to be as efficient as possible and included exhaust gas heat recovery. However, when the original heat exchanger fitted to the exhaust system failed after just a few years of operation, the client approached HRS to provide a more robust and reliable replacement. The HRS G is acomplete stainless-steel multi-tube heat exchanger


specifically designed for exhaust gas cooling and thermal recovery. The hot exhaust gases flows through the interior tubes of the heat exchanger while the service fluid, in this case water, flows though the


surrounding shell. The use of stainless steel is a key factor in the longevity of the G Series and rapid corrosion of the original carbon steel unit was one of the reasons for the original’s failure. Other design features include a bellows to allow for thermal


expansion, and a drain in the header to allow the acidic condensate which forms during operation to be removed, as well as a hatch to allow to manual cleaning and inspection. In operation the new G Series heat exchanger cools the exhaust gas from


~530°C to ~320°C and the heat recaptured from the process is used in the AD facility and to provide hot water around the site. Since installation the HRS G Series heat exchanger has performed so well that HRS has been asked to quote for the replacement of another unit which is used to treat the digested sludge from the plant, with an HRS DTI Series unit.


HRS Heat Exchangers www.hrs-heatexchangers.com


16 WINTER 2020 | INDUSTRIAL COMPLIANCE


/ INDUSTRIALCOMPLIANCE


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