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Static elimination Static elimination


Static electricity can be troublesome in many production processes where non-conductive materials such as plastic, paper, wood and textile are processed.


How do you know if in your situation static electricity plays a role? Most common problems are easy to recognise:


g Sparks jump over


g People get shocks


g Materials cling together and are difficult to process


What causes static charge?


Static charge is mainly caused by friction and separation of poorly conducting materials. Static charge can be demonstrated by measuring with an electrostatic fieldmeter. See the section measuring instruments for possibilities or get advice from a Simco-Ion represenatative.





g The process is disrupted


g Your product attracts dust


g Fire is caused


Which method is the most effective to reduce static charge?


Non-conductive materials (insulators) cannot be discharged by grounding. The most effective and durable solution to reduce the static charge is by active ionisation. Active ionisation is created by the use of air ionisers. These generate large numbers of positive and negative ions in the surrounding atmosphere, which serve as mobile carriers of charges in the air. As ions flow through the air, they are attracted to oppositely charged particles and surfaces. Neutralization of charged surfaces is rapidly achieved through this process.


Generation of static charge


Measuring static charge Download our whitepaper: ‘‘Understanding ionisation’’ for more information: www.simco-ion.co.uk/wp


Ioniser


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