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HOUSTON, WE HAVE AN ELECTRIC SOLUTION CELEBRATING 50 YEARS SINCE THE APOLLO LANDING


Words by Christian Lynn, Editor D


SEI is fast approaching, putting military and


defence electronics back on the map. This issue of Electronics goes all guns blazing on this topic, covering concerns on establishing a British source for military grade oscillators and crystals (p. 26), EMC solutions for Tempest and UK Naval systems (p. 33) and the implementation of virtualisation into safety-critical military/ aerospace systems (p. 34). This issue of Electronics also includes a preview for DSEI (p. 30), covering the exhibitions and conferences that aim to fi re up clients’ minds.


Christian Lynn - Editor T


he quote is iconic. The images from the Lunar surface are embedded in our brains. But most importantly, the technology that brought the feet of the esteemed Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the bedrock of the Moon remains revered within the industry: to cross Earth’s atmosphere and take man beyond his grasp, is a technical achievement that remains unrivalled. The electronics industry recognises


this, as it celebrates the engineering that revolutionised guidance, navigation and circuitry.


Of course, the most


signifi cant of these accomplishments is the Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC), the fi rst of its kind, poetically suitable for the fi rst man to set foot on the Moon. A computer based on integrated circuits (ICs), it was a huge leap forward from the vacuum tube manufacturing that preceded the ceramic/ silicon based ICs that build the body


of contemporary electronics hardware. With an innovative UI – the DSKY – taking over an amount of manual control through digitised commands as well, and the Apollo 11


shuttle hinted at what was to come in terms of miniaturisation, integrated circuitry and a digital language. One small step for man, one signfi icant step for small-scale electronics.


Schneider Electric has joined the newly formed ISA Global Cybersecurity Alliance as a Founding Member. The Alliance has been assembled to advance cybersecurity readiness and awareness, bringing together end-user companies, technology and systems vendors, among others. Fellow contributors include Honeywell and Claroty.


www.schneider-electric.co.uk


SensiEDGE announces the SensiBLE 2.0, a portable IoT module, powered by a rechargeable Li-Ion battery. Included in its structure are the BLE v 4.2 stack and Arm Cortex-M0 32-bit core, certifying it for its use in designing IoT products for both hardware development and/or production logistics. SensiBLE 2.0 is available from: Arrow Electronics and Mouser.


www.sensiedge.com


KDPOF is pushing its applications within the automotive market, looking to enhance the current Ethernet standard – 10GBASE-SR – through the implementation of its plastic optical fi bre technology. KDPOF believes that the scaled data rates and resistance to harsh environments will suit the demands of the automotive industry. Prototypes are projected for completion by the end of 2021.


www.kdpof.com R


esearchers and engineers at RMIT University have mimicked the human brain, by constructing an electronic chip that uses light to formulate modifi able memories. Drawing inspiration from


optogenetics, a tool that enables scientists to manipulate neurons through the use of light, this chip is intended to charge up the path towards an artifi cial intelligence that can harness the acute functionality of the human brain.


4 JULY/AUGUST 2019 | ELECTRONICS


BIOMETRIC MARKET REFUSES TO FLATLINE T


he global biometrics market’s unprecedented growth is set to reach $11.1 bn by 2023, with changing consumer demands and the emergence of the Internet of Things fuelling this rapid development. The source of this information, Frost & Sullivan, says that the market is currently valued at $4.6 bn, totalling a staggering annual growth rate of 19.3 per cent. Considering how biometric technology has fully integrated into the mainstream – in retail, healthcare and policing for example – this peaked growth doesn’t come as a huge surprise.


A CHIP OFF THE OLD MEMORY BANK


Jason Tooley, chief revenue


offi cer at Veridium, the biometric authentication platform provider, had this to say: “This predicted growth rate is entirely understandable. The ever-growing threat of cyber attacks and risk of fraud, coupled with consumer demands for a more streamlined experience, can be heavily attributed to the boom in the market. As companies evolve their digital transformation strategies with new services, such as the Cloud, it’s critical to ensure a secure experience that meets regulations.” Veridium


www.veridiumid.com


On its purpose, research team leader Dr Sumeet Walia said: “Our optogenetically-inspired chip imitates the fundamental biology of nature’s best computer: the human brain. Being able to store, delete and process information is critical for computing, and the brain does this extremely effi ciently. We’re able to simulate the brain’s neural approach simply by shining diff erent colours onto our chip. This technology takes us further on the path towards fast, effi cient and secure light-based computing, an encouraging step forward for artifi cial intelligence.”


Developed at RMIT’s MicroNano Research Facility, the technology is compatible with existing electronics and has also been demonstrated on a fl exible platform, for integration into wearable electronics.


RMIT University www.rmit.edu.au


/ ELECTRONICS


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