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ENCLOSURES FEATURE


BCL Enclosures has announced a new range of IP65-rated door enclosures that are dust-tight and able to be washed down, so suit environments such as food processing and others where there may be a high degree of airborne particulates


Solid or transparent door enclosures A


vailable with solid or transparent doors in a wide range of sizes, the


BED Series is also flame retardant to UL94V-HB. Manufactured from UL-approved ABS-HB plastic, the BED Series is also robust and meets the IK08 standard which ensures that contents are protected from objects weighing up to 1.7kg dropped or falling from a height of up to 300mm. The BED Series consists of 16 models,


ranging in size from 300mm x 200mm x 130mm, up to 700mm x 500mm x 250mm. All are lockable and available in standard grey RAL 7035. The enclosures


can be ordered with either solid or transparent doors, which allows for visual inspection without exposing the contents to the environment in which they are placed. Galvanised steel back plates and mounting brackets are supplied as standard with all models in the range. Temperature rating is -20o


C to +85o C. For applications requiring a higher


degree of protection from water, BCL also supplies an IP66-rated range of enclosures, the BN range, suitable for high pressure water jets and exposure to high humidity, plus an IP67-rated BO range.


BCL Enclosures


bclenclosures.com


New laser marking service for electronic enclosures


Electronic enclosures manufacturer OKW has added new laser marking technology to its range of customisation services


L


aser marking of legends and logos is waterproof, smudge-proof and


durable. It is ideal for very small machine-readable markings such as sequential QR codes or barcodes. Consecutive numbering can be carried out quickly, easily and cost effectively. Using a laser to mark an enclosure


provides a more resilient solution than printing, as it physically changes the colour of the surface. Dark and light


plastic parts turn grey at the point of marking. Suitable materials for laser marking


include ABS, ASA+PC and ASA+PC-FR, polycarbonate, polyamide and aluminium. Depending on the materials involved, the following enclosure colours are good for high-contrast laser marking: off-white, pebble grey, light grey, lava and black.


OKW Enclosures okw.co.uk I


nitially available in four plan sizes, each in two heights, it is available in polycarbonate, sealed to


IP68, and ABS, designed to meet IP66. Rounded corners and top face give a modern smooth


style, and environmental sealing allows the enclosures to protect the housed equipment against dust and water entry in dirty and damp environments. The 1557 can be used as a free-standing enclosure when fitted with the supplied feet, or it can be wall-mounted with either four visible fixings or two hidden ones. PCB standoffs are provided in both the lid and base.


The enclosure is assembled with corrosion-resistant M4 stainless steel machine screws, which are threaded into integral stainless steel bushings for repetitive assembly and disassembly. The IP68 polycarbonate versions are UV stabilised for outdoor use with a UL94-5VA rating, and the IP66 ABS versions have a flammability rating of UL94-HB for indoor use.


Hammond Electronics  hammondmfg.com ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING | MARCH 2020 13


NEW ENCLOSURE FAMILY ANNOUNCED


The new 1557 family has been announced by Hammond Electronics


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