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RENEWABLE ELECTRICITY AS STANDARD


H


ello and welcome to


the July/August issue of Electrical Engineering. Britain is set to achieve a


electricity generation milestone this year, with more electricity generated from zero carbon sources than fossil fuels, for the first time since the Industrial Revolution. According to National Grid, annual


power generation data from the last decade shows that Britain’s reliance on cleaner energy sources will overtake fossil fuels this year. This marks a historic achievement in Britain’s journey towards the government’s target of net zero emissions by 2050. I attended the launch of Schneider


Electric’s Rethink Energy initiative at the beginning of July, where the path to a zero carbon Britain was debated. Ben Golding from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy summed it up by saying that we have always needed to get to net zero, but the question has always been when, not if. Hopefully this will be sooner rather


than later, taking into account the progress that the country has made over the past ten years, where we can say that 2019 will be the year net zero power beats fossil fuel fired generation for the first time. This issue features an interview


with Eaton’s Ciarán Forde on the company’s UPSaaR pilot, along with the latest in Batteries & Chargers, Encosures, Racks & Cabinets, Safety in Engineering, Surge & Circuit Protection, and Test & Measurement.


Enjoy the summer! Carly Wills, Editor


 E


.ON is now providing all of its residential customers across Britain with a 100 per cent


renewable electricity supply on all tariffs as standard, and at no extra cost. The change means more than 3.3 million homes


now have an electricity supply matched by renewable sources, including wind, biomass and solar. E.ON’s announcement is said to be the largest of its type to date in the UK. “Climate change is the defining issue of our era,


and one that energy customers are increasingly concerned about,” said E.ON UK chief executive, Michael Lewis. “Our announcement is an important first step in a journey towards a more sustainable and personalised energy system, but the future of energy doesn’t stop here. The opportunities include helping all of our customers to better manage their energy through smart, personalised and sustainable technologies.” E.ON is directly supplying a large proportion of


this renewable electricity through its own renewable generation fleet, as well as agreements with independent wind generators around the country to directly purchase the electricity produced. The remaining electricity used by customers is


matched with 100 per cent renewable electricity sourced externally through such things as renewable electricity guarantee certificates from the likes of wind, biomass and solar sources. These certificates guarantee that an equivalent amount of renewable electricity was generated to the amount supplied. E.ON owns more than 20 onshore and offshore


wind farms in the UK, as well as biomass plants in Scotland and South Yorkshire.


  


RAMP UP YOUR PRODUCTION 


WAGO-I/O-SYSTEM 750 series • Allows seamless automation of complex industrial systems • Modular system can be quickly scaled up to meet future challenges • Compact design saves control panel space, leaves room for expansion • Supports all commonly used network protocols, ensures ease of use and short development times


DMX


Telephone 01788 568 008 E-Mail ukmarketing@wago.com Internet


www.wago.com Search for “WAGO 750”


UNITRUNK CHECKS IN TO HILTON PROJECT


C


able management specialist, Unitrunk, is providing cable ladder, trunking tray and basket


for a new £20m Hilton Garden Inn project in Stoke-on-Trent. The 140-room hotel is due to open its doors to its


first guests by the end of 2019 and has been funded with the help of a £6.9m investment from Stoke-on-Trent City Council, and a £2.96m grant from the Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Local Enterprise Partnership. The construction project is due for completion in


November and electrical contractor, Carter M&E, selected Unitrunk for the cable management thanks to the ease and speed of use of the company’s rapid installation systems solutions. Unitrunk’s cable management systems will be


installed in the new hotel’s corridors, communal areas, bar and kitchen to provide the infrastructure for all power, data, low voltage and alarm system cabling. With tool-free, faster installation from both the company’s UniKlip cable tray and Easyconnect cable basket, it is claimed that the Carter M&E team can reduce installation times by up to 50 per cent, helping to keep the business-critical, fast-track installation programme on schedule.


ELECTRIC NATION TRIAL E


smart charging from its involvement in the Electric Nation trial. DriveElectric recruited 700 EV drivers to take part


in the three-year project and managed the process of installing smart chargers at participants’ homes, as well as being responsible for all customer-facing activity. The project monitored participants’ charging habits to gather data, including frequency, length and amount of energy consumed. The trial concluded with participants being


financially incentivised to change their charging behaviour, producing clear indications that this could be a successful strategy for addressing distribution network congestion issues that could be created by home EV charging.


lectric vehicle (EV) specialist, DriveElectric, is celebrating the valuable information gained about


4 JULY/AUGUST 2019 | ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING





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