search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
NEWS ROUND-UP Dye for a longer life, urges Regenex


Regenex is challenging hospitality and healthcare industries to dye tired linen in order to ‘resurrect’ it and help reach low carbon ideals at the same time. After all, it has to be better than ‘burying’ it in landfill. Commercial linen revival specialists Regenex has developed new systems in textile coloration, designed to help laundries get the most out of every piece of stock. The company is expanding its unique dyeing service for tired linen that has lost its original whiteness or colour – to avoid many tonnes of such serviceable material being condemned to landfill.


Directors believe colouring or re-colouring is an under-utilised solution for hospitality and healthcare linen and are now in talks with customers and contacts about its possibilities. Regenex’s vision for lowering carbon emissions and conserving the world’s resources is set out in a new white paper, ‘Don’t dump it, dye it: Getting the most out


of linen with coloration’, available as a free download from the Regenex website. The Bradford, West Yorkshire-based start-up is best-known for its patented stain removal processes for white linen. Now in its fourth year, it can count several major laundry chains in the UK and beyond on its client list. The firm has also dyed 75 tonnes of material so far, in trials and smaller contracts – and is now opening up such services to more customers and partners.


David Midgley, managing director of Regenex, pictured, said: “These are exciting times of new possibilities for saving carbon and money through better management of linen. “Companies are very wisely ramping up their eco-credentials as we prepare to emerge into a post-Covid world. One easy way to make big improvements is to be more careful with textiles, and get the most out of them, before ordering replacement stock.”


Sustainability policies are more important than ever, with the World Economic Forum declaring climate change and human environmental damage as the very biggest threats to industry, in its Global Risks Report 2021.


Paul Hamilton, technical director of Regenex, said: “We have been refining our processes and we’re delighted to open up our dyeing service. This will be a game changer for many laundries, hospitality and healthcare operations. It’s a secret weapon in reaching low carbon ideals.”  Regenex is offering a free 400kg dyeing trial to all new customers. Get in touch by clicking https://www.regenex.co.uk/


Ken Cupitt elected WCL Master


As LCN goes to press we have just heard that Ken Cupitt has been elected Master of the Worshipful Company of Launderers with his inauguration taking place on 21 June. Cupitt began his career in the industry in the 1960s and also joined the Guild of Cleaners and Launderers in that decade and has been a WCL Liveryman for many years. He is one of the GCL’s longest serving members. It was not long before his talents showed through and he was asked to join the National Council, where he remains to this day as chairman, having graced every senior position on the Council.


Under his leadership the Guild has survived,


largely due to his leadership skills and dedication in sharing his knowledge and experience.


Cupitt has long taken on the mantle of provider of education, information, and support services within the laundry and drycleaning industries for which, in his retirement, he continues to work tirelessly. The outgoing Master of the Worshipful Company of Launderers is Captain Jack Strachan MBE who was inugurated in July 2019.


@LCNiMag


June 2021 | LCN


7


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33