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The perfect 10: I


n the UK, 5.7 million businesses have fewer than 250 employees. It can be key to their survival for these Small and Medium


Enterprises (SMEs) to create coherent and effective security and resilience strategies.


What are the top tips for smaller businesses to be more resilient to threats to their people, property and assets?


1. Understanding potential threats


The starting point should be to understand the key potential threats to your organisation. It’s difficult to put measures in place that limit the exposure to risk unless the likely sources of potential threat are identified. City centre locations, or those close to major public infrastructure such as travel hubs, hospitals or universities, are likely to be at higher risk of attack than others, for example, if only because your business might get caught up in an attack, fire or explosion from a neighbouring building.


Know your neighbours and their potential threats because they could end up being your threats too. If your organisation is involved in, or supplies products or services to organisations involved in, potentially contentious activities, including financial services, oil and gas, meat production, animal testing, arms procurement, tobacco, gambling, then you may be at higher risk than others. Understand where you sit on the threat scale and you can then plan accordingly.


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