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Cont ent s 1 Welcome 2


3 4-5 6 7 8-9 10 11


What is a ‘resilient’ security company?


What makes a city resilient?


The perfect 10: Resilience for SMEs


Ensuring business continuity no matter the threat


Free tools and critical communications don’t mix


Predictive thinking and past strategy


Security Officer as first responder - so much more than boots on the ground


It’s a dog’s life


12 Mental Health: The missing link in resilience planning


13 Making communities resilient 15


Creating a resilient security operation - The Francis Crick Institute


16-17 Responding to Chemical Biological & Radiological (CBR) threats


18-19 The Manchester Arena Attack New approaches to bereavement support


20 21


Managing a crisis - planning an effective media strategy


How Business in the Community (BITC) supports Local Resilience Forums


22-23 Partnership update -Spotlight on the Register of Charter Security Professionals and a Report from the CSSC AGM


25


Professionalism goes beyond accreditations


26-27 Preparing for the security & fire safety engineers of tomorrow


29 31


An effective response to risk diversity Issue 8


Resilience - isn’t it just Business Continuity Planning?


How resilient is your business? B


as critical elements in risk planning. But what does this mean? Our autumn edition aims to provide some of the answers.


We begin with an explanation of the work of local resilience forums, with a detailed exploration of the London Resilience Group and its work across London to prepare for, respond to and recover from all eventualities.


This is followed by ten top tips for resilience planning for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) which in reality provides a good checklist for organisations of any size.


In a complex security landscape, we also analyse what makes a resilient security operation with a number of related articles: we consider the response to the convergence of physical and cyber security operations; how security officers can be trained as first responders; and how to recognise and implement flagship security. On a lighter note, and a first for the magazine, we interview security dog Marley to learn more about his background and the role he plays in security.


A critical aspect of managing a crisis is having an effective media strategy and we cover the key components to have in place to help ensure the long-term survival of your business.


In terms of personal resilience, we explore how to support staff who have been involved with a major incident. We also look into new approaches to bereavement support developed in response to the devastating attack at the Manchester Arena in 2017.


As autumn unfolds and a new academic year begins, this edition also reviews progress in professionalism in security. This includes a discussion on the training needed for security and fire engineers of the future plus latest security related standards.


Everyone at City Security magazine sends their deepfelt condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of PC Andrew Harper from Thames Valley Police who lost his life in August 2019.


We will be exhibiting at International Security Expo 3-4 December at Olympia and look forward to seeing you there.


Eugene O’Mahony, Executive Editor and Andrea Berkoff, Editor.


Regularly updated, our website hosts over 500 articles written by leading figures in security, all available in easy to search categories at www.citysecuritymagazine.com


You can also follow us @Citysecuritymag


Subscribe for FREE from our website. Available in both print & digital format. © CI TY S ECUR I TY MAGAZ INE – AUTUMN 2 0 1 9 www. c i t y s e c u r i t yma g a z i n e . c om


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SECURITY ISSUE 73 - AUTUMN 2019


CITY®


usinesses, organisations and individuals must remain resilient in these uncertain and changing times. And resilience and recovery are now recognised

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