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52


Future of Retail — Customer Engagement


issue 05


and dissatisfied customers. The knock-on effect of a simple admin oversight could result in a loyal customer becoming a brand detractor, and a competitor winning their business. I also explore how staff morale, and employee


engagement, increases when staff feel that their role, no matter how remote from frontline service delivery, is valued as part of the whole organisation’s ability to achieve its customer promise. Of course, those staff in direct contact with customers daily will have the greatest impact – positive, or, negative. But what is “customer promise”? In my book,


10-Steps to Retail Success, I explain how through brand identity and positioning, promises are made


to potential customers – some explicit e.g. the range offered, price points, and some implied e.g. look and feel, brand reputation etc. As a result of these “promises”, brands can attract those who believe the anticipated experience will suit them, and, conversely, it can deter those who feel the opposite. Of course, once expectations are set, the rest of the operation must live up to them, through all aspects of service delivery, and through all touch points with customers. My key message, reinforced throughout both the


keynote and the book, is that long-term customer loyalty depends on trust – and trust is built through consistently ensuring that all the simple interactions between customer and brand continue to live up to


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