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Making travel positive


Touring operators are working to make sure travel is a force for good. Joanna Booth explores the sector’s drive for sustainability


Sustainable travel can seem like an oxymoron. Read a few headlines about the carbon impact of flying, and it can feel as if journeying any significant distance is entirely negative – that going on holiday is the moral equivalent of punching a kitten. While there’s no denying air travel has a huge environmental cost, exploring the wider world can also have a positive impact. Practical benefits include economic support for local businesses and community projects in the destinations we visit, creating livelihoods for millions of people around the world. And on a more intangible level, our interactions


24 March 2020


with other cultures and exotic wildlife can motivate us to make more sustainable choices in our everyday lives, from buying Fairtrade products to minimising our single-use plastics.


SUSTAINABILITY, BUILT-IN There’s a good argument to be made that escorted touring is, intrinsically, a more sustainable way of seeing the world. Travelling in a group – most tours carry between 10 and 50 people – is more environmentally friendly than using individual transport (emissions per head are four times lower if you go by coach rather than car), and moving on to different


travelweekly.co.uk/atas


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