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BUSINESS NEWS


Deloitte’s Raoul Ruparel says ‘the prime minister does want a [Brexit trade] deal but not at any price’


‘A no-deal Brexit would compound Covid crisis’


The odds on a no-deal Brexit are shortening. Ian Taylor reports


Talks on a post-Brexit trade deal are stalled and the government appears ready to break international law by flouting the agreement on Northern Ireland it made with the EU to ‘get Brexit done’ at the end of last year. The latest developments increase


the chances of ‘no deal’ adding to the Covid crisis, according to Raoul Ruparel, former special adviser to Theresa May and a member of Deloitte’s Global Brexit Insights team. Ruparel warned: “If we don’t have


40 17 SEPTEMBER 2020


clarity by mid-October, the chances of no deal increase substantially [and] people will become increasingly concerned about the interplay between two economic shocks at the turn of the year. “Covid far outweighs Brexit. Covid


has hit travel and hospitality hard [and] travel won’t be as hard hit by Brexit. Brexit will tend to hit pharma and financial services. But a no-deal Brexit wouldn’t help if there is ongoing disruption due to Covid.”


Ruparel will address Abta’s Travel


Convention on October 14 on Brexit. He suggested: “The prime minister does want a deal, but I don’t know he desperately wants one. He doesn’t want a deal at any price.” He explained the sticking point


in talks through the summer had been that “the EU is unwilling to get into more detail” until the issues of


Continued on page 38 travelweekly.co.uk


BUSINESSNEWS


PICTURE: Shutterstock


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