search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Continued from page 12


and the inception of the National Coal Board (N.C.B.), the investment in the industry as part of Nationalisation meant mechanisation was rolled out across the coalfields at an unprecedented rate. Suddenly, miners and mining officials were working with more and more mining machines, each of which coming with specific lubrication requirements.


Coal mining brought very specific challenges to the lubricant manufacturer. The environmental conditions underground meant it was not just the type of machine that dictated the choice of lubricant but the surroundings themselves. Water has always an acute problem when looking at lubrication. Whether dealing with steam engines, air-operated tools or simply the wet conditions found underground, there were benefits in using lubricants with good chemical stability which readily separated from water. Dirt and dust is also an inseparable part of the mining environment. Grease was often used in preference to oil because it forms a superior seal to what would be potentially abrasive dust.


Planned lubrication methods were introduced by the N.C.B. in an effort to keep down the number of lubricants in use, to make maintenance simpler and to avoid confusion. By compromising in the selection of lubricants, the number of grades used in an averagely-sized colliery would be manageable, with some specialty grades included when needed for specific functions, such as with pneumatic tools. The list of lubricant types illustrates the range of machinery used in the twentieth century that was reliant on regular lubrication.


For example, a longwall coal-cutting machine would have its oil levels checked, its sprocket wheel greased daily and the cutting chain oiled twice per shift.


During the twentieth century, mining practice shifted from a mix of systems including pillar and stall, shortwall and longwall methods to predominantly longwall mining throughout the British coalfields. This effectively rationalised the types of machines used in British mining. The machinery also grew larger and the scope of their work increased,


A Dosco Roadheader going through basic maintenance © Open Government Licence v3.0


Continued on page 16


14


LUBE MAGAZINE NO.132 APRIL 2016


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73