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IBF Maintenance


While they contribute to a reduction in engine maintenance requirements, IBFs need dedicated maintenance to function effectively. “The best practice is to treat the maintenance of the IBF as you would your engine. It is the first line of protection from component wear, cost prevention, and unplanned downtime,” Newman says. “In extreme conditions, operators equipped with IBFs watch their indicators more often to make sure they do not need to clean or replace their filters, and to make sure they are able to return to base and service the filters. Operators cannot afford to fly in extreme conditions without an IBF.”


The maintenance procedures of Donaldson Aerospace and Defense originated from the OH-58D Kiowa Warrior aircraft that were equipped with IBFs prior to their deployment in the 1990s. “We spent nearly 30 years building upon this knowledge to develop what are now industry standard practices. Each system contains the instructions for continued airworthiness (ICA) document or the operational maintenance manual (OMM),” Newman says. Routine cleanings are required when the filter maintenance aid (FMA) indicates the need or after 300 hours, whichever comes first. The type of media, dry or wet, determines the cleaning regiment required. Many times, simply tapping out the debris will delay the need to clean the filter. When it is time to clean, a wet media filter will need to be washed and the oil replaced. A dry media may be tapped out, rinsed, or replaced. Both need to be allowed to dry before reinstalling.


Donaldson Aerospace and Defense IBF system installed on an Airbus AS350.


Photo: Donaldson


74


Sept/Oct 2018


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