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FlightSafety International Awarded TH- 57 Aircrew Training Services and C-17 Aircrew Training System Contracts


FlightSafety International has been awarded Bell TH-57 Aircrew Training Services and Boeing C-17 Aircrew Training System contracts. “The TH-57 and C-17 contracts FlightSafety has received clearly demonstrate our ability and commitment to provide the highest quality products and training services,” said Ray Johns, executive vice president. “All of us with FlightSafety are proud to be selected as the prime contractor for the TH-57 program


and to be part of the Boeing C-17 team. We sincerely appreciate the support Frasca International and Aechelon Technology are providing for the TH-57 contract.”


FlightSafety has been selected as the prime contractor for TH-57 Aircrew Training Services program. The flight training will be provided to the United States Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard as well as international students. FlightSafety will deliver instruction and contractor logistics support and manage the replacement of the current training devices. The Level 6 and Level 7 flight training devices, Image generators, visual databases and projectors are scheduled to enter service in February 2019.


The C-17 Aircrew Training System contract was awarded to FlightSafety by Boeing to support the United States Air Force Air Mobility Command. The work will be performed at 15 U.S. Air Force locations and the Royal Australian Air Force base in Amberley, Australia. The contract includes program management, aircrew instruction, and courseware development as well as on-site support and upgrades for the training devices and visual systems. As the manufacturer of the C-17 weapon systems trainers that are currently in service, FlightSafety will ensure that the upgrades and improvements to the aircraft are rapidly incorporated into the training program and systems.


Following this new battery of tests, this penalty was removed completely in cases where an aircraft could pass the OEM health check with the PA100 installed.


New Improvement to the PA100’s Rotorcraft Flight Manual Supplement


DART Aerospace recently presented an improvement to the Rotorcraft Flight Manual Supplement (RFMS) for its PA100 PUREair engine protection system for Airbus Helicopters H125/ AS350 and H130/EC130.


In order to unlock some additional power, DART and PALL Aerospace Corp. agreed to support a new flight test program where additional data was gathered, allowing them to reduce RFMS restrictions on a PA100-equipped aircraft.


The previous RFMS applied an 85 kg penalty when calculating hover performance, regardless of whether the aircraft could pass the OEM engine health check with the PA100 installed.


For operators of the AS350B3e with Arriel 2D engines, the VEMD can be configured so that there is no performance penalty with the PA100 installed — ever.


For operators of AS350B3 (and earlier) aircraft and EC130B4/T2 aircraft that do not pass the OEM health check with the PA100 installed, penalties have been reduced to 52 kg (HIGE) and 58 kg (HOGE).


This improved performance is available to all new deliveries as well as DART customers on all six continents that are already operating this system.


Want to see your news here? • Email it to the Editor-in-Chief: lyn.burks@rotorcraftpro.com


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