search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Bell’s Busy With Deployments


When it comes to the deployment of the latest military helicopter models, Bell is currently focused on three areas.


The first is the U.S. Marine Corps’ H-1 upgrade program. Under H-1, the Bell AH-1Z Viper and UH-1Y Venom are replacing the USMC’s AH-1W SuperCobras and UH-1N Twin Hueys respectively. Both new aircraft offer higher performance and more modern systems than the helicopters they are replacing, plus 85 percent common parts between them for easier servicing and swap-outs.


With the exception of four HH-1Ns operating as search-and- rescue aircraft, “all of the Marine Corps’ UH-1Ns have been retired,” said Scott Clifton, Bell’s director of global military business development. “There are now about 160 UH-1Ys in the Marine Corps fleet, so we have built all the UH-1Ys the USMC decided to buy.”


As for the AH-1Z, according to Clifton, the Marines have already deployed these helicopters on the U.S. West Coast, and are now moving to extend them to their Pacific Ocean bases and finally to the East Coast. “The Marine Corps likens this transition to changing the tires on your car while still driving down the road,” he said. “The squadron doesn’t stand down from the deployment cycle while it gets its new AH-1Zs and UH-1Ys into service.”


The second area is the continuing deployment of the Bell- Boeing V-22 Osprey in the USMC and USAF fleets. Thanks to its tilt-rotor configuration, the V-22 provides faster air speeds, higher ceilings, and much more range than conventional helicopters, plus the ability to be refueled in flight. There are now four variants of this model (USMC, USAF, USN, and International) including one being developed for the Japanese navy.


Because the V-22 tilt-rotor represents a significant change in operations for the USMC, squadrons receiving these new aircraft are pulled from the deployment rotation in order to retrain their pilots and maintenance staff. Again, the Marine Corps is focused on performance. As soon as these squadrons know how to fly and support their V-22s, they’re right back into the deployment rotation.


“The extra range, power, and fuselage space in the V-22 means that you can fly much further – especially with in-flight refueling – plus carry far more sophisticated communications and/or medical gear in the large V-22 fuselage,” Clifton said. “That’s something you could not do with legacy helicopter platforms.”`


The third area keeping Bell busy is its support for the U.S. Navy helicopter training program. As mentioned earlier, Bell is proposing its 407GXi as a TH-57 replacement.


60


Sept/Oct 2018


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92