search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
From The Desk of The Editor Adaptability is Key:


The Invisible Hand I’ve always felt the shapers of the American experiment from the late 1700s were not only exceptional, but brilliant thinkers. Their ideas and ideals still guide our success in the 21st century. Take Adam Smith for example and his theory of the “invisible hand.”


Investopedia says: Smith’s theory of the invisible hand constitutes the basis of his belief that large-scale government intervention and regulation of the economy is neither necessary nor beneficial. Smith put forth the notion of the invisible hand in arguing that free individuals operating in a free economy, making decisions, primarily focused on their own self-interest, logically take actions that result in benefiting society as a whole even though such beneficial results were not the specific focus or intent of those actions.


Naturally, “making decisions, primarily focused on their own self-interest,” requires a certain level of adaptability to ensure one’s survival. For a while, I was beginning to doubt our industry’s ability to adapt to unmanned aerial vehicles. In 2015, at Heli-Expo, I interviewed HAI president, Matt Zuccaro, on the subject of integrating UAVs into the helicopter industry.


When asked how the helicopter industry should approach this new technology, he encouraged operators to adapt and integrate it into their businesses under the premise that helicopter operators are the experts in low-altitude, vertical lift ops, and are best positioned to succeed. He went on to say, “If I was still an operator, I would be creating a new division in my company for unmanned vehicles.” In the 18 months following that call to action, it seemed like few were listening as there was little movement from the industry, but that seems to be changing.


Watch Zuccaro video interview on UAVs


communities safer. As it turns out, the theory of the invisible hand is playing itself out in the LE community as it adapts to new technology.


One does not have to look any further than the A.L.E.A. website to see that they are producing several events related to UAVs. The first is a three-day Public Safety Drone Expo being held in New Orleans in October. They also are producing an On-The-Road course for Remote Pilot in Command training. This course is designed to provide individuals with a review of the Federal Aviation Regulations PART 107 Remote Pilot Certification process and train agencies how to operate UAVs.


Other sectors in our industry should follow the lead of the airborne law enforcement community and adopt a spirit of exploration and adaptability, lest the invisible hand pushes you out of the way.


Lyn Burks, Editor In Chief


Publisher Brig Bearden


brig@rotorcraftpro.com Editor-In-Chief Lyn Burks


lyn.burks@rotorcraftpro.com Assistant Editor Pam Landis


pam.landis@rotorcraftpro.com Account Executive Teri Rivas


teri.rivas@rotorcraftpro.com Layout Design Bryan Matuskey Boris Grauden


production@rotorcraftpro.com Online Accounts Manager Lynnette Burks


lynnette.burks@rotorcraftpro.com Copy Editor


Rick Weatherford rick@rotorcraftpro.com Social Media Guru Laura Lentz


Subscription / Circulation Manager Pam Fulmer


Contributing Writers


James Careless Sharon Desfor


Rick Weatherford Eric Lian


Law enforcement aviation units are masters of survival and adaptability. Always under scrutiny, units are constantly asked to justify budgets, prove a return on investment, and show how efforts have made their


2 May/June 2017 Matt Johnson


Randy Mains Brad McNally Tim Pruitt


Randy Rowles Scott Skola


Rotorcraft Pro®


is published six times


a year and mailed out on or around the 10th of every other month by: Rotorcraft Pro Media Netwok, Inc. Rotorcraft Pro® is distributed free to qualified subscrib- ers. Non-qualified subscription rates are $57.00 per year in the U.S. and Canada, $125.00 per year for foreign subscribers (surface mail). U.S. postage paid at Fall River, Wisconsin, and additional mailing offices. Publisher is not liable for all content


(including editorial and illustrations pro- vided by advertisers) of ads published, and does not accept responsibility for any claims made against the publisher. It is the advertiser’s or agency’s responsibility to obtain appropiate releases on any item or individuals pictured in ads. Repro- duction of this magazine in whole or in part is prohibited without prior written permission from the publisher.


Corporate Officers Brig Bearden / COO Lyn Burks / CEO Mailing Address


367 SW Bluebird Ct., Ft. White, FL 32038


Toll Free: 877.768.5550 Fax: 561.424.8036 www. rotorcraftpro.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86