search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
out the terrain below and around me. I flew for about five minutes when the Miramar controller radioed, “He says he sees your red anti-collision light Life Flight One. Can you guide him out?”


Because he was flying a military aircraft we didn’t have a common radio frequency to talk to one another so we had to relay through Miramar tower: “Tell him to follow me. I’ll show him the way home.”


“Roger.”


I led the much larger H-61 helicopter out of the mountains, his good engine delivering only enough power to keep him from flying into the ground, mainly because the terrain was falling away as we flew west, so he managed to avoid flying into the ground. Over my radio, I


heard, “He sends you his thanks, Life Flight One and says he doesn’t know how he would have made it out without your help.”


“My pleasure, Miramar. We’re flying back to the hospital now.”


That story is a good example of a twin- engine helicopter,


in this case unable


to meet either Performance Class 1 or Performance Class 2 during the enroute phase of flight.


My personal view is that no matter what their capability, Performance Class 1, 2 or 3, I much prefer the peace of mind flying a helicopter with two engines rather than just one because, as in the Marine crew’s case: You never know when you’ll need that second engine.


Randy Mains is an author, public speaker, and an AMRM con- sultant who works in the he- licopter industry after a long career of aviation adventure. He currently serves


as chief


CRM/AMRM instructor for Oregon Aero.


He may be contacted at: info@randymains.com


rotorcraftpro.com


9


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86