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keeps you from thinking about work or anything else and it humbles you to know that you are not always smarter than a fish.


RPMN: What is your greatest career accomplishment to date?


The industry does a lot of work on safety issues… smart people strategize on ways to improve our safety statistics by working on human factors, decision making,


fatigue, aeronautical technologically


improved cockpits, and a myriad of other “interventions” that are designed to lower the accident rate.


My personal favorite is that people who participate in the FAA WINGS Program or in type clubs (like the Bonanza Club or the Cirrus Club) have an accident rate that is a factor of 10 lower than their peers! I am privileged to work with the FAA Safety Team (FAAST) to take the benefits of the WINGS Program (continuing education and peer-to-peer networking) out to venues where the small operators, pilots, and ATMs can participate in a helicopter- specific safety program.


RPMN: In your view, what is the greatest challenge for the helicopter industry at this moment?


As we speak, our industry is being challenged by the drones! They will rapidly expand in both numbers and in capabilities and we will have to


continually justify our jobs as pilots. In the future, we will be working with both manned and unmanned aircraft in the National Airspace. We need to make sure that we are changing with the times and increasing our value to customers who ultimately pay for our flight time.


Do you know someone who would be a good subject for Meet a Rotorcraft Pro? Email your suggestion to the editor-in-chief:


lyn.burks@rotorcraftpro.com.


RPMN: Have you ever had an “Oh, crap!” moment in a helicopter? Can you summarize what happened?


As a young pilot, whose career began in Vietnam, I experienced a lifetime’s worth of “oh crap” moments. I feel like maybe more than most of your readership combined.


RPMN: If you could give only one piece of advice to a new helicopter pilot, what would it be?


They say that flying a helicopter is “hours and hours of boredom accentuated by moments of sheer terror!” If that moment ever comes, you (and your passengers) will only live through it if you have spent those “hours and hours” wisely. Hone your skills and knowledge every day and never allow yourself to become complacent. If you love what you do, you will never work a day in your life!


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