search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
VIBRATION IDENTIFICATION


For more than half a century, experts have struggled to find the most efficient and effective method for providing optimized, yet simple, helicopter track-and-balance solutions. This is firstly because each helicopter is different, from its manufactured elastomeric or composite rotor parts to its rotating mechanical tolerances; meaning that abnormal vibration is custom to a particular helicopter. The best practice or balancing method must meet two main criteria:


it must adapt to each individual


helicopter by learning the individual characteristics of each specific tail number, and it must adapt to changes to each individual helicopter over time. “As rotor parts wear, their behavior gradually changes, affecting the characteristics of vibration. Any balancing method must account for these changes in its solution or it will not be effective,” says Serrano.


VIBS software provides next-generation technology to your current Track and Balance Equipment.


regardless of the manufacturer, allow faster analyses that are often put into practice by operators according to the indications of the vibration identification systems. Applicable corrections include the addition or removal of weights, or the variation of the length of the step control rods, which results in the variation of the aerodynamic load of the blades. Automatic systems are also used by manufacturers since they get good results with a few flights, thus saving on production times and costs.


The methods available today to identify, analyze and correct the level of vibrations originate from companies that developed specific software adaptable to any type of helicopter and/or rotating part. All such solutions allow good results, both on new production helicopters and on helicopters already in service. “The systems can be broadly categorized as manual, semi- automatic or automatic, depending on their ability to provide indications, and their ability to process data to eventually indicate the corrective actions to be taken,” Pucillo says. Maintenance technicians use the basic Chadwick 177/Strobex system for the analysis and correction of vibrations, he says. This instrument has the merit of forcing operators to deepen technical concepts and learn how to face and correct almost any type of vibration. The successors of this basic system,


“Imbalances in certain parts of the main rotor system have greater vibration impact than other out-of- balance parts. For example, a pitch link adjustment dynamically affects the blade differently than the trim tab adjustment. Even though you may experience a nonlinear balance response from an adjustment, you still have a linear relationship between adjustments and balance,” Serrano says.


“Empirical evidence from the prioritized adaptive direct adjustment method with our Vibration Intelligent Balance Solution (VIBS™) technology verifies this to be true. This is because one of the main features of VIBS™ is the prioritized


rotorcraftpro.com 79


adaptive adjustment algorithm. In other words, we balance things in a particular sequence because that is effective. The VIBS™ learning algorithm is also simple, direct, and deterministic. In short, VIBS™ knows what to balance first. Moreover, its being deterministic means that it does not have to rely on learning from guesses. Empirical data shows that the first adjustment suggested by the VIBS™ method usually results in a dramatic vibration reduction. Then subsequent adjustments converge quickly and result in superior balancing results in just a few iterations.”


Some helicopter types feature permanent helicopter usage monitoring systems (HUMS), which allow the vibration of the rotors and major components such as engines and transmission boxes and their subcomponents to be read at any time during the flight. “HUMS allows monitoring of every potentially critical component, provides the advantage of preventing potential mechanical failures, and anticipates the corrective actions with great gain in terms of flight safety,” Pucillo says.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90