search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
TRACPLUS GOES FAR BEYOND POSITION REPORTS


Since New Zealand’s TracPlus (www.tracplus.com) was launched in 2007, its primary purpose has been to provide reliable, flexible real-time tracking of aircraft equipped with GPS-enabled positional transmission equipment at a low monthly cost that everyone can afford.


“Since that time, we’ve seen a lot of advances in how our customers use our service,” said Chris Hinch, TracPlus chief innovation officer.


“USING EQUIPMENT MADE BY TROTTER CONTROLS, FLIGHTCELL INTERNATIONAL AND ROCK SEVEN, OUR CUSTOMERS NOW SEND TRACKING AND EVENT DATA TO OTHER SOFTWARE SYSTEMS SUCH AS ACCOUNTING AND MAINTENANCE SYSTEMS (AUTOMATICALLY AND IN REAL TIME), SAVING HUNDREDS OF OFFICE HOURS EACH YEAR OF DATA RE-ENTRY AND TRANSCRIBING PILOTS NOTES.”


This is just part of TracPlus’ vision of what Hinch calls “the globally connected cockpit,” where TracPlus provides seamless tracking, event and global text messaging services – not only from air to ground and back, but between aircraft.


And that’s not all. “We can now let people on the ground mark their location in an emergency and tell


66 July/Aug 2018


a nearby aircraft to ‘find me,’” Hinch said. “A pilot conducting a search- and-rescue can mark the location of floating wreckage in their EFB and share that in real time with a Coast Guard vessel. A fire spotter wearing an augmented reality helmet can plot a fire bombing run with drop- start and drop-stop points directly into the gate controller onboard another aircraft, all using our new messaging system.”


TracPlus is continuing to build new capabilities into its global messaging platform, such as sending detailed flight briefings and other long messages to aircraft via satellite that are otherwise unable to receive this essential information by any other means. “By breaking up these large messages we can reassemble them on the aircraft in remote locations, allowing the aircraft to fly a mission that it would be otherwise unable to.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90