search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Garmin Introduces G3000H Integrated Flight Deck to Part 27 VFR/IFR Turbine Helicopter Market


equipped for ADS-B In/Out, offers visual approach guidance, and an HSI map. The G3000H touch-screen interface boasts superior in-flight features and benefits that reduce pilot workload, providing this class of helicopters with the best situational awareness tools available on the market today.


“The G3000H blends a superior feature set and safety-minded technology into a contemporary platform for the VFR/IFR turbine helicopter market,” said Carl Wolf, vice president of aviation marketing and sales. “With the G3000H, we’re excited to bring IFR capabilities in an advanced integrated flight deck and further expand our product offering so our partners have even more options within this class of helicopters.”


Garmin International, Inc. recently announced the G3000H, an IFR-capable integrated flight deck specifically designed for Part 27 turbine helicopters. The forward-fit G3000H offers a number of features, including WAAS/SBAS, ILS approach capability, VFR and IFR helicopter charts and Connext®


wireless integration. It’s also


Built with a flexible and scalable architecture that can be tailored to a variety of helicopter designs, the G3000H combines widescreen, high-resolution displays with touch-screen controls that serve as the pilot interface to the integrated flight deck. The landscape- oriented displays offer immediate access to critical in-flight information in a consolidated, easy-to-read format. The G3000H also features pilot-selectable split-screen capability that allows for two or more separate pages to be displayed simultaneously, so pilots can easily access valuable decision-making information on a single screen.


Historic Sycamore Helicopter Flies Home


The world’s last flying ‘Bristol 171 Sycamore’ helicopter returned home to Weston-super-Mare when it flew to the Helicopter Museum 60 years after it was built. The historic aircraft was displayed in its Duke of Edinburgh Hangar until the Weston Air Show in late June.


Sycamores were the first British helicopters to receive a certificate of airworthiness, and were produced by the Bristol Aeroplane Company from 1955 to 1959 at its Oldmixon factory on the former Weston Airfield where the museum is now based. Until this week a Sycamore had not flown in the UK for more than 46 years, and a large crowd visited the museum to be part of the homecoming.


Siegfried Schwarz – chief helicopter pilot of the Flying Bulls Display Team and the only pilot qualified to fly a Sycamore – explained


what it meant to bring the helicopter back to Great Britain and particularly Weston- super-Mare after so long. “It’s an incredible feeling,” said Schwarz, ”because it took us 10 years to get the helicopter airborne, get my license and everything else and then finally we made it to Great Britain, and to the home of the Sycamore.”


Bristol 171 Sycamore OE-XSY/XG545 is the only remaining airworthy example in the world and made its first flight from the historic Weston Airfield on Feb. 3, 1958 before


being delivered to the West German Navy in VIP configuration and later transferring to the German Air Force. After retirement the aircraft, now privately owned, was moved to Switzerland where it was repainted in RAF colors in 1988 and then eventually sold to the Flying Bulls display team based in Austria 18 years later. By this time the aircraft required an extensive overhaul. With technical assistance from the Helicopter Museum, including the supply of archived maintenance manuals, the Sycamore flew again in July 2013.


rotorcraftpro.com


33


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90