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Stan Braun


RPMN: What is your current position? I am the


director


RPMN: When and how did you choose to fly helicopters? Or did they choose you?


of maintenance for


Haverfield Aviation in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Haverfield operates 23 MD 500 D and E models, one Garlick UH- 1H, and one Delta Enterprises UH-60 A model Blackhawk. Haverfield Aviation is an innovative operator that utilizes its fleet to service the transmission power grid


throughout the United States.


Haverfield offers comprehensive visual inspections, demolition and construction, maintenance, OPGW support, aerial tree trimming, helicopter lift services, FLIR, and drone services.


RPMN: Tell me about your first flight.


My first flight, which gave me the aviation bug, came when I was 8 years old. My father was a high school teacher. He asked his coaching colleague, Paul Johnson, to take us for a flight in his Cessna 182. It was a great experience and that feeling of freedom has stuck with me still to this this day. Ultimately, it became the catalyst to my dream of a career in aviation and it made me who I am today.


RPMN: How did you get your start in helicopters?


I have always been interested in helicopters. I was one of the lucky ones that the United States Marine Corps gave a shot. I made it through aircrew training and was selected for 6114/6174 MOS (Huey crew chief/door gunner). I feel that was the greatest job that I ever had as it married two of my passions: helicopters and guns. I continued on and became a 6177 WTCCI trainer and NATOPS instructor.


12 July/Aug 2018


Growing up, the only exposure to aviation in north-central Wisconsin was the fixed- wing world. Airplanes do have their strong points, but the universal ability of the helicopter allows for many more applications and possibilities. It was the only way to go, in my eyes. Growing up working summers on a farm and being out in the fields all day planted the seed for helicopters, field work, and travel. It truly combined my love for the outdoors, aviation, and fixing machines all together in one package.


RPMN: Where did you get your start flying commercially?


When my time in the USMC came to an end, I was fortunate to utilize my G.I. Bill and earn my A&P license. After completion of my schooling, I caught wind of a traveling job from an old Marine Corps buddy. He had decided not to take the job as he was having his first child. This September will mark the beginning of my 15th year at Haverfield. I began as a field mechanic, traveling the United States for the first eight years. I


was asked to join the corporate office in 2012 in the role of production manager. I enjoyed that position for two and a half years before becoming the director of maintenance. It is in my current role as director of maintenance that I have been able to really sink my teeth in and affect real change. The last three and a half years have had many industry challenges, and Haverfield has risen to meet them all.


RPMN: If you were not in the helicopter industry, what else would you see yourself doing?


Wow, such a great question. I quite possibly would have developed my own business. At this stage I may not know what specific area of focus it would be. I would definitely be utilizing my translatable skills that I have developed in the aviation industry: customer relations, logistics, budgeting, profit margins, managing personnel, sales, and negotiations.


RPMN: What is your greatest career accomplishment to date?


Since becoming director of maintenance at Haverfield Aviation, my goal has


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