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DECONTAMINATION


Figure 1


Figure 2


equipment. It can be noted that there are both ‘spikes’ and troughs’ of sound about a mean. In surgical instrument cleaning settings, the spikes of sound are of little consequence, but the size and duration of the troughs of sound are of great concern and where we need to focus our attention. The CVD device that produced these graphs achieves its results via nine sets of readings, each of 20 seconds duration, with 10 individual readings per second, meaning 1800 individual readings overall. The section ‘readings 1-3’ gives us the average size of the spikes and troughs across the whole 1800 individual readings and it is noted that in this set the mean voltage was 19.254mV and the min reading was 13.4mV. A 5.85mV variance does not sound like a lot, but when cleaning at this level on a contaminant that is extremely difficult to remove, it is too much and trials carried


out between 2014 and 2016 proved this conclusively. What is also of concern is the length of time that a trough can last. In this graph, we can clearlly see a trough of sound (in green) that is 2 seconds in duration, plus a further 2 seconds while the power fell before recovering again. This highlights a period of 4 seconds where cleaning can be impaired. Graph 2 shows the activity in a system, where the incoming sound has been manipulated to greatly reduce the size of the spikes and troughs, while still creating the chaos required to deliver an effective clean. Again, looking at ‘readings 1-3’, we can see that the mean in this set of readings was 27.828mV and the min voltage was 27.2mV, showing a variance of only 0.628mV across 1800 individual readings. The readings taken with this device are done so across three levels within the fluid depth and from side to side. In essence,


52 l WWW.CLINICALSERVICESJOURNAL.COM


these results are unique, extremely accurate and deliver a never-seen-before insight into the activity of high frequency sound when applied into fluid. Readings such as this have been taken in tanks 5m in length that delivered very similar results.


It’s a simple fact that if something can be measured, it can be improved. This has been the case with the CVD, as apart from being able to look at competitor equipment and having a product to sell, we have also been able to insert this probe into our own equipment, enabling several modifications to be made to further enhance the performance, efficiency and capability of the cleaning system.


Foil test


This erratic dispersion of sound is clearly highlighted when conducting a foil test. It is a misconception that when holes are created


JANUARY 2021


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