search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
DECONTAMINATION


Tackling infection risks: advanced ultrasonics


David Jones offers an insight into the development of advanced ultrasonic technology to ensure effective cleaning of surgical instruments. After years of R&D, the result is a solution that is claimed to render instruments and lumens completely protein free, while meeting the demands of HTM guidance.


The application of sound into fluid to deliver an efficient cleaning process has been around for many years and has been utilised to great effect. However, there is clean and then there is clean. So, what do we actually mean when we use this word? Certainly, the requirements for general commercial and industrial cleaning are far removed from what is required in the decontamination sector.


Historically, ultrasonics have been used in an attempt to remove proteins from surgical equipment prior to processing in a thermal device. The results, however, were erratic – leading the sector, in many cases, to discard the process altogether through uncertainty of the results achievable with the equipment provided. Nevertheless, the fact remains, if set up correctly in a controlled manner, with complete focus on the application of sound, ultrasonic technology can achieve exceptional levels of precision cleaning capable of meeting the high demands of the healthcare and medical sector.


How does fluid-based ultrasonic cleaning technology work? Transducers bonded to the base or side of a tank are excited by high frequency electricity, causing them to expand and contract at very high rate. This mechanical action causes high speed flexure of the radiating tank face(s). The speed of this movement


is too fast for the fluid in the tank to follow, resulting in the production of vacuum chambers.


On the upward flexure, the vacuum is released in the form of a vacuum bubble that rises up through the fluid until it hits an object, (or the surface of the fluid) upon which the bubble implodes under high pressure, creating a micro-jet that draws away


The design and functionality of Medstar 3 renders instruments and lumens completely protein free to both inside and outside surfaces, and has several patented features that enhance the performance and enable compliance with the HTM.


50 l WWW.CLINICALSERVICESJOURNAL.COM


any contamination that may be on the surface of the object. This, in a nutshell, is how the technology works. However, there are limitations as to how effective and efficient the cleaning action will be in isolation.


Attaining and maintaining ‘zero’ Alphasonics took up this challenge in 2013, having operated predominantly in a sector that required regular, precision cleaning of very delicate components without causing damage. It was pondered if the same technology could provide the elusive ‘zero’ that the decontamination sector was striving for. The fundamental question is what are we


actually trying to achieve – zero what? Zero bacteria or zero protein? From the research and development carried out over the past eight years, it has become clear that one cannot be achieved without the other. Zero bacteria will never be consistently reached if


JANUARY 2021


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80