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R EHABI L I TATION


Sharing he has found “the last six months very frustrating in terms of having conversations about this within the NHS”, Dr. Etherington stressed that “there’s a lot of difference between providing guidance and having support and operationalising any service”.


He explained: “We need to assess people


properly. That will require expertise and equipment and we need to be able to set goals for people and monitor their outcomes and for them to be properly measured. Particularly in the period we’re in now, we need to use occupation as an outcome – getting people back to occupation and to their paid employment is going to be really important.”


Sharing his frustrations that “there’s too much of us thinking about mental health as a separate issue to a physical debility”, Dr. Etherington later explained that rehabilitation in the UK doesn’t get the proper recognition it deserves, particularly at this critical time for “managing the health of this nation and our economy and reducing the burden on the economy.” Explaining that there is a real return on investment for rehabilitation, he cited studies in Germany which highlighted a ratio return of at least 5:1, thanks to improving physical and psychological outcomes which reduces areas including the cost of medical interventions, the demands people place on social benefits and social care costs while increasing tax and productivity. He concluded: “There’s clearly an argument and need to do this and I think the problem is we don’t know who to talk to, to get this to change. Simply putting a bit of guidance on a website and activating assessment clinics, I don’t believe addresses the full needs of the patients we see.”


Jack Chew was the final speaker, exploring the role of Rehab Recruits – specifically, the role he played in positioning MSK therapists as efficient and strategic professionals for rehabilitation deployment in the NHS. Jack recalled how he looked at the MSK community and how the professions within MSK could be optimally placed to support during the pandemic – trying to identify in an MSK capacity, what is the skillset and the commonalities that could help COVID patients outside an acute setting. Exploring the questions “What are the common aspects across the MSK professions that we can lean into” and “what can we offer as way of a unified workforce” Jack’s thinktank led on a ‘Rehab Recruits’ policy which resulted in thousands of clinicians agreeing to be deployed within the NHS to help with


ISK/KUR/161020/SJM/V1 JANUARY 2021


About Connect Health Change


Connect Health “Change” has developed a series of webinars to make and embed transformation in healthcare. Aimed at system leaders and clinicians across the NHS, the webinars provide practical solutions to the challenging issues we are all grappling with.


rehabilitation of COVID patients. As Jack explained, this ‘Rehab Recruits’ initiative ended abruptly: “It’s not just about what the clinical needs are, or the clinical workforce’s abilities. It then becomes operational and governance based. We


encountered the barrier that it was all well and good in theory, but in practice, the application of that workforce and the recognition of that clinical skillset does not necessarily get agreed with by the powers that be. It therefore can’t be implemented.” This is partly because those in power do not comprehend that scaled-functional rehab is at the heart of, not just MSK care, but also rehabilitation in general, he explained. Jack concluded that there is a “clear miscomprehension on the utility of MSK professionals,” but that “the MSK workforce is in a very good place to be able to assess and at least triage for the treatment they’re not appropriate for.” To view the seminar, visit: https://


www.connecthealth.co.uk/connect-health- change/11-november/ This includes further insight from the speakers including a full Q&A session.


CSJ


Blood Cultures. Shouldn't ZERO contaminants now be the target?


Blood Cultures. Shouldn't ZERO contaminants now be the target?


Blood Cultures. Shouldn't ZERO contaminants now be the target?


Blood Culture Collection Sets


The Kurin Lock® with Flash Technology automatically sidelines the initial flash of blood which may contain skin contaminants. Roughly 20% of the microbes present in skin reside deep in the dermis¹. During venipuncture, contaminants can be drawn into blood culture samples leading to high rates of seemingly unavoidable false positive blood cultures.


Reducing False Positives Blood Cultures will;


 Improve accuracy of blood culture test results.  Reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing and usage.


 Reduce length of stay for patients, associated risk of HAI's and excessive costs.


. Hospitals spend £2,000 - £12,00022 per false positive result prevented.


 Deliver significant reduction in the economic burden; £2,000-£12,0002


with significant cost savings. Blood Culture Collection Sets


The Kurin Lock® with Flash Technology sidelines contaminants in the initial flash of blood which may contain skin contaminants. Roughly 20% of the microbes present in skin reside deep in the dermis¹, with venipuncture, contaminants can be dislodged and drawn into blood culture samples leading to high rates of seemingly unavoidable false positive blood cultures.


Why Use It? Approximately 1/3 of all positive blood cultures are false positive results due to blood culture contamination1


per false positive test that


When Kurin was used, even hospitals below the 3% benchmark reduced blood culture contamination rates by up to 90%3


1. Garcia RA et al. Am J Infect Control. 2015 Nov 1; 43(11): 1222-37. 2. Alahmadi YM et al. Journal of Hospital Infection 2011; 77:233-6 3. Sutton J et al. Professionals in Infection Control, June 13-15, 2018 Minneapolis, MN [Abstract: EI – 101] Poster.


When Kurin was used, even hospitals below the 3% benchmark reduced blood culture contamination rates by up to 90%3with significant cost savings.


How does it work? Each Kurin blood culture collection set features Kurin Lock®, an elegantly simple, an intuitive design that requires no additional user steps. Kurin is a passive device that automatically sidelines potential contaminants during blood culture collection.


Serves as a flash chamber to provide visual confirmation of proper needle placement in the vein.


Contaminants residing in the initial ~0.15ml of blood are sidelined in the U-shaped side channel.


References. 1.Garcia RA et al. Am J Infect Control. 2015 Nov 1; 43(11): 1222-37. 2.Alahmadi YM, et al. (2011) “Clinical and economic impact of contaminated blood cultures within the hospital setting”. J Hosp Infect. 2011;77(3):233-236. 3.Sutton, J et al. Poster Pres. Association for Professionals in Infection Control, June 13-15, 2018 Minneapolis, MN [Abstract: EI – 101]


UKTel: +44 (0) 208 869 6509 IRL Tel: +353 (0) 1 428 7895 Email: uksales@iskushealth.com www.iskushealth.com


UKTel: +44 (0) 208 869 6509 IRL Tel: +353 (0) 1 428 7895 Email: uksales@iskushealth.com


www.iskushealth.com ISK/KUR/161020/SJM/V1


leads to unnecessary treatment of non-existent bloodstream infections. Extended hospital stays increase the risk of hospital-acquired infections and adverse events and unnecessary antibiotics hamper efforts to improve antibiotic stewardship. The excess costs of these can run into hundreds or thousands of £. Kurin has been proven to reduce false positive rates by up to 90%3.


How does it work? Each Kurin blood culture collection set features Kurin Lock®, a small but powerful specimen diversion device that automatically sidelines the initial flash of blood during the routine process of drawing blood for culture.


1. Garcia RA et al. Am J Infect Control. 2015 Nov 1; 43(11): 1222-37. 2. Alahmadi YM et al. Journal of Hospital Infection 2011; 77:233-6 3. Sutton J et al. Professionals in Infection Control, June 13-15, 2018 Minneapolis, MN [Abstract: EI – 101] Poster.


Serves as a flash chamber to provide visual confirmation of proper needle placement in the vein.


Contaminants residing in the initial ~0.15ml volume of blood (35x a standard 21G needle) are sidelined in the U-shaped side


When the collection bottle is attached, blood flows into the culture bottle.


When the collection bottle is attached, blood flows from the vein into the culture bottle through the sampling channel.


WWW.CLINICALSERVICESJOURNAL.COM l


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