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ENERGY MANAGEMENT | TECHNOLOGY


Good energy management is now an essential aspect of an effective injection moulding operation. Machinery manufacturers are now meeting this challenge with new technologies and features to achieve energy-saving goals, writes Mark Holmes


Energy drive: making savings makes sense


Twenty to thirty years ago energy saving and good energy management practice in injection moulding was certainly not as high up the agenda as it is now. Rising energy costs and the need to meet sustain- ability targets mean that current injection moulders need to look at all aspects of their operations to keep energy usage in check. Injection moulding machinery manufacturers are introducing an array of features and new technologies on modern equipment that can greatly assist with this endeav- our. However, some sensible and practical tips can be also employed to keep energy costs down in an injection moulding facility (see article on page 25). Netstal is observing increasing demand for all electric injection moulding machines, even for higher clamping forces, with energy efficiency being a major reason. “This trend is being driven by a number of factors,” says Marcel Christen, Product Manager Packaging and Medical Systems for KraussMaffei’s Netstal brand. “These include


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reduced emissions and an increase in precision and controllability, as well as energy efficiency optimisation.” Nevertheless, improvements are still being developed. “For all rotational movement, the electric drive concept provides an ideal solution,” adds Christen. “However, translational movement is more challenging with small strokes and high loads, for example, the movement and contact of the injection unit. Although various solutions are available for this on the market, hydromechanical solutions are still commonly used. Another current challenging topic is the cost of direct driven electrical solutions.” He says: “One other interesting area of develop- ment is electric mould auxiliaries, such as core pullers and hot runner shut off systems. It would be beneficial if electric cylinders were available that could easily replace hydromechanical cylinders. We are also looking to define standards for clear and functional interfaces between the machine and


Main image: Injection


moulders can reduce energy costs and become more sustainable


June 2021 | INJECTION WORLD 15


IMAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK


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