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MATERIALS | ENGINEERING PLASTICS


the potential for use of laser transmission welding grows, according to Lanxess, which claims it allows complex geometries to be produced in a cost-effi- cient and resource-friendly manner. The company has added three new products to its existing selection of LT (laser-transparent) Durethan polyam- ides and Pocan polybutylene terephthalates (PBT). “The new materials possess a range of important


properties that allow them to be used in a broader range of applications,” says Claudia Dähling, an expert in technical plastics at Lanxess. “Potential applications include components for electrified vehicle drives and driver assistance systems as well as devices for the Internet of Things.” Pocan B3233XHRLT is a new 30% glass fibre-


reinforced PBT with “excellent” resistance in a hot and humid environment, as demonstrated in the SAE/USCAR-2 Rev. 6 long-term tests of the Ameri- can Society of Automotive Engineers, says Dähling. “Materials like these are almost unprecedented on the market because standard additives for hydroly- sis stabilisation generally cause the laser transpar- ency of PBT to deteriorate significantly.” Most flame retardants also diminish the laser


transparency of thermoplastics, Dähling adds. They are, however, needed for components in battery systems for electric vehicles. “With Durethan BKV30FN04LT, we can offer a corresponding compound based on PA6,” she says. It uses a halogen-free flame-retardant package that gives the compound a UL 94 V-0 rating. The leaves hardly any deposits in the tool and provides a high tracking resistance of 600V (CTI A, Comparative Tracking Index, IEC 60112) making it well suited for components for high-voltage batteries and plugs. Pocan TP150-002 is a 30% glass fibre-reinforced


PBT compound exhibiting a laser transmission (980nm) of 13%, which Dähling says is around double the transparency of most other laser-trans- parent PBT product types.


Duranex 750AM is a 30% glass-reinforced, flame-retardant grade PBT from Polyplastics


Recently, Polyplastics launched a new flame


retardant Duranex PBT grade that it says has the outstanding electrical properties traditionally found in PBT while also offering low warpage, high rigidity, and heat and hydrolysis resistance. Duranex 750AM is a 30% glass-reinforced com- pound said to be well suited to automotive applica- tions such as communications devices and high- pressure parts for EVs and HEVs. “Until now, it has been difficult to satisfy require- ments for both flame resistance and hydrolysis resistance because hydrolysis resistance typically decreases with the addition of a FR component,” says the company. “There has been an increasing demand for FR materials in the automotive market for use in communication devices and high-pres- sure parts for EVs and HEVs. These materials must also meet the auto industry’s need for high durability and outstanding formability. Duranex 750AM and other PBTs also meet the demands of electrical and electronics applications.” Other new products from Polyplastics include a


Duracon acetal (POM) for fuel pumps, grades with improved slip and wear and — made available for the first time outside of Asia — an acetal for medical applications.


CLICK ON THE LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION: �www.covestro.com �www.m-ep.co.jp/en (Mitsubishi EP) � www.sabic.com �www.dsmep.com �www.ascendmaterials.com �www.dupont.com � www.ultrason.basf.com � www.domochemicals.com � www.radicigroup.com � www.lanxess.com � www.polyplastics-global.com


62 COMPOUNDING WORLD | May 2020 www.compoundingworld.com


Lanxess has introduced several new laser-transparent polyamides and PBTs


PHOTO: POLYPLASTICS


PHOTO: LANXESS


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